Jul 11, 2020  
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED 
    
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


 

Geological Engineering

  
  •  

    GEOE 368 Carbonate Sedimentology F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The origin, composition and diagenesis of carbonate rocks. Study of modern carbonate sediments and depositional environments; development and design of facies models; petrographic and geochemical analysis of limestones and dolostones.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 36
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 238  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 401 Field Studies in Geology II F | 1.5


    Lecture: 0
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    A multi-day field trip that uses stratigraphic, sedimentological, paleontological, and structural data to interpret shallow-and deep-marine rock successions in a paleoenvironmental and tectonic context. Enrollment is limited. NOTE: The course runs during the week of Canadian Thanksgiving. Students are responsible for the cost of transportation, accommodation and food during the trip. Please see the Departmental web page for more information.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 9
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): (A minimum GPA of 2.90 in each of  GEOE 221 , GEOE 238  and GEOE 321 ) and permission of the Department.
    COREQUISITE(S): GEOE 488  
  
  •  

    GEOE 402 Deleted - Exploration and Mining Geology Field School (two weeks) |


    A two-week, intensive field course. Design and application of field data collection methods in exploration and mining projects, and in environment site remediation. Elements of design include: surface mapping and underground surveying in mining camps, drill core logging, determination of geological properties, 3D geological projections, integration of scientific literature and mining industry reports. Production of a final report with design solutions. Offered next in Spring 2010. Students should consult with course instructors regarding field trip costs. COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 10
    Engineering Design 50

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOL 300 or GEOE 310  (GEOL 310), and GEOE 362  (GEOL 362), or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 403 Deleted - Geotechnical and Geo-Environmental Field School F | 3


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 2
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Technical discussions and working tours of sites involving exposure to major geotechnical and geoenvironmental design projects in various stages of development, with a focus on mining engineering, mine waste management and civil engineering works. The key geological engineering and design issues associated with each project are examined, from preliminary engineering design through engineering control of construction through long-term monitoring and maintenance. Students evaluate current design issues and develop engineering design solutions which are presented in the form of engineering reports and presentations. Preference given to students in the G5 and G6 Options.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 6
    Engineering Design 30

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 281  (GEOL 281), GEOE 310  (GEOL 310)
  
  •  

    GEOE 409 Deleted - Applied Geophysics: Laboratory F | 5


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 2.5
    Local field exercises and laboratory assignments using a wide variety of geophysical site-investigation and exploration methods. Lectures will be used to teach basic instrument theory, and to teach the principles of exploration program design. The course includes a four-day field exercise to design and carry out an integrated geophysical site investigation. Evaluation is based on submitted technical reports arising from the practical assignments. Offered next in 2010/11. Students should consult with course instructors regarding estimated field trip costs.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 319  (GEOL 319) or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 410 Geological Engineering Field School F | 3.5


    Lecture: 1.5
    Lab: 2
    Tutorial: 0
    A one week intensive field course with associated discussions and project work during the term. Design and application of field data collection methods in exploration and mining projects, underground and surface mine works and for site remediation.. The key geological engineering and design issues associated with each project are examined, from preliminary engineering design through engineering control of construction through long-term monitoring and maintenance. Students evaluate current design issues and develop engineering design solutions which are presented in the form of engineering reports and presentations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 28
    Engineering Design 14

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year Geological Engineering 
    COREQUISITE(S): GEOE 446  
  
  •  

    GEOE 413 Geomechanics and Rock Engineering Design F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.8
    Tutorial: 0.25
    Rigorous application of geomechanics and rock engineering principles to open-ended design problems related to surface and underground excavation, construction and geo-hazard mitigation. Presentation and discussion of design methodologies and case histories are followed up by related analysis and design problems incorporating industry standard software. Emphasis on the inherent variability of geomaterials and implications for integrated site-investigation planning, quantitative risk assessment, design decision-making and performance-monitoring. A field excursion will be included.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 281 and GEOE 300  and GEOE 321  and GEOE 359 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 418 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Petroleum Geology F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The origin, migration and accumulation of petroleum resources, emphasizing typical reservoir styles, potential reservoir lithologies, methods of exploration and basic concepts of formation evaluation. Concepts and applications equip students with the basic principles necessary to undertake petroleum industry exploration and production. Laboratory exercises include a major exploration design problem and presentation. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 238  
    COREQUISITE(S): GEOE 321  
  
  •  

    GEOE 419 Engineering Geophysics Field School S | 3.5


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 3
    This nine day, intensive, tri-university field course focuses on field and laboratory techniques using a wide array of geophysical site investigation and exploration methods. Lectures are used to review basic instrument theory, and to teach the principles of exploration program design. The course culminates in an exercise to design and implement an integrated geophysical site investigation. Course takes place before start of 4th year. Students should consult with departmental website regarding estimated field trip costs.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 28
    Engineering Design 14

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year Geological Engineering, or permission of the Queen’s University instructor
    COREQUISITE(S): GEOE 446  
  
  •  

    GEOE 421 Deleted - Igneous Petrology |


    Rock classification and tectonic associations, petrochemistry, petrogenesis, the origin and differentiation of primary magmas, plate tectonics and magmatic evolution. Phase diagrams of igneous minerals. Laboratory study of rock suites and special projects. Offered next in 2011/12, and every second year thereafter. COURSE DELETED 2014-2015

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 30
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 235  (GEOL 235) or GEOL 335
  
  •  

    GEOE 422 Deleted - Metallogeny and Mineral Exploration |


    Integration of geological, mining and metallurgical engineering, economic, political, social and environmental issues, and application of ore deposit modeling and geophysical and geochemical exploration methods, in the design of comprehensive exploration programs for the discovery and development of Earth materials in an economic and environmentally responsible manner. Offered next in 2014/15, and every second year thereafter. COURSE DELETED 2014-2015

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 28

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 362  or permission of the instructor
    COREQUISITE(S): GEOE 362  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 429 Deleted - Geophysical Signal Analysis and Inverse Theory W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Underlying theory and guiding principles of digital geophysical data collection and processing system design. Discrete Fourier and sampling theory; filter poles and zeros, signal shaping, least-squares and prediction filters; causality implications. Applications to processing of potential field map data and waveform time series. Theory and practice of geophysical inversion culminating in the design and construction of optimized quantitative Earth models. Discrete linear problems, maximum likelihood, Lanczos decomposition, uniqueness and accuracy. Nonlinear problems from seismic imaging. Offered next in 2009-2010, and every second year thereafter. COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 6
    Natural Sciences 7
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 8

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 338  (MATH 338) and GEOE 319  (GEOL 319), or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 439 Advanced Applied Geophysics W | K3


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: yes
    Tutorial: no
    Advanced theory and techniques for acquisition, processing and interpretation of geophysical data. Students solve a geophysical problem from the initial idea through strategy development, data acquisition, processing, to interpretation, communication and deliverables. Engineering projects will exploit seismic, gravity, magnetic, electromagnetic, geodetic and GPR techniques but the emphasis is on problem solving using integrated data from multiple methods/sources. Target areas include oil/gas/mineral exploration, near-surface prospecting and site investigation. Processing will use both available and student designed software.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 12
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 232  (or MTHE 225  ) and GEOE 249  and GEOE 319  or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 445 Deleted - Site Investigation and Case Histories F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The course provides an overview of current geological engineering problems and innovative solutions, and relies on guest speakers, most of whom are practicing professional engineers. Topics such as professional practice and liability, engineering ethics, provincial and national environmental legislation, and the Occupational Health and Safety Act are presented and discussed. Guest lecture topics may include: buying and selling professional services, water supply management, contaminant abatement and/or remediation, management of engineering construction. Starting in Fall 2009, a one-day field exercise in engineering surveying methods will be held early in the term. COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 7
    Engineering Science 5
    Engineering Design 30

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of third-year common core for GEO ENG, or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 446 Engineering Design Project I F | K3


    Lecture: No
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    Student teams research, prepare a design work plan and carry out a “PhaseI” engineering investigation for a major, open-ended geological engineering project, in consultation with a Management Board comprising geological engineering faculty. Work plans adhere to current national and/or provincial regulations as appropriate, and include scope definition, development of a range of technical solutions to the engineering problem, cost analyses and project scheduling tasks. Design meetings are recorded in the form of minutes submitted to the course Management Board and time sheets are submitted. Engineering project work plans are presented and defended to a committee comprising faculty and external engineers. Evaluation is based on the presentation and the team-written preliminary design report. These reports form the basis for more in depth design work in GEOE 447  in the winter. Students must register in both GEOE 446 and GEOE 447 .

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year Geological Engineering
  
  •  

    GEOE 447 Engineering Design Project II W | K5


    Lecture: No
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    Student teams carry out design work, including detailed analysis, synthesis, and presentation for the open-ended engineering projects proposed and initiated in GEOE 446 . Projects adhere to current national and/or provincial regulations as appropriate, and include further development of engineering solutions while controlling project schedule, budget and critical path design objectives. Data are obtained from industrial sources, government documents, engineering reports, the appropriate literature, and field studies and testing. Design projects, including methodologies, budgeting and technical components will be defended in class to a committee. Evaluation is based on two presentations and the team-written design report. Students must register in both GEOE 446  and 447.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 60

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 345  and GEOE 446  
  
  •  

    GEOE 452 Instrumental Techniques Applied to the Study of Solids W | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    The theory and practical aspects of the techniques of X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy are studied. Other techniques including Mossbauer, infra-red spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will also be covered. An extensive term project is required where the student employs these techniques to study a material of their choice. This course may not be offered every year.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 232  or permission of the Instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 452 Instrumental Techniques Applied to the Study of Solids W | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    The theory and practical aspects of the techniques of X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy are studied. Other techniques including Mossbauer, infra-red spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will also be covered. An extensive term project is required where the student employs these techniques to study a material of their choice. This course may not be offered every year. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 232   or permission of the Instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 462 Advanced Petrogenesis and Metallogenesis W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Application of the fundamental principles of igneous petrology, geochemistry and fluid-rock interaction to metallogeny and ore genesis. Training in ore microscopy and mineral paragenesis with mineral chemistry and lithogeochemical data for selected case studies. Lectures, critical reading, discussion sections, laboratory work and seminars will provide an understanding of ore forming processes.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 27
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 27
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 362  and GEOE 365  or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 463 Spatial Information Management in the Geosciences F | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to spatial information management focusing on methods to support and extend geological mapping, mineral and petroleum exploration, and engineering site investigation. Computers and computation, GIS software and theory, spatial simulation and analysis, databases and data management, and design of effective decision support solutions.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 14
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 28
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 333   or permission of the instructor
    EXCLUSION(S): GISC 201  

  
  •  

    GEOE 464 Visualization in Geosciences W | 1.5


    Lecture: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introduction to 3D visualization of natural sciences data with a focus on methods relevant to geological engineering, mineral exploration, and geoscience research. Perception, representation, and analytical methods. Design tools and data integration methods. Temporal analysis of natural sciences data. LiDAR data analysis. Global and local models. Virtual worlds.

    Academic Units:
    Engineering Science 18
    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 463  or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 465 Deleted - Exploration Geochemistry W | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Principles of geochemistry in mineral exploration, and the use of geochemistry in tracing specific paleohydrologic flow in complex, multicomponent media in systems that deposit ores. Primary and secondary dispersion and their significance in geochemical exploration. Selected case histories. Field and analytical techniques, and interpretation of geochemical data. Design of exploration programs. COURSE DELETED 2012- 2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 26
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOL 362 or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 466 Isotopes and the Environment W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    This course is designed to expose advanced students in the fields of biology, chemistry, geography or geology to the principles of stable isotope and radiogenic isotope systematics in natural processes. Emphasis will be placed on the use of isotopes in tracing elemental cycles, biological cycles and hydrologic cycles and how some isotopes can be used to place constraints on the timing of specific events in these cycles.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 48
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 365  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 475 Exploration and Environmental Geochemistry F | 4.3


    Lecture: 2.75
    Lab: 1.8
    Tutorial: 0
    Principles of rock-water interaction and element migration in the near surface environment applied to environmental and exploration geochemistry. Students learn field and analytical techniques, evaluate and interpret geochemical data, and design solutions related to geochemical hazards to human health, environmental impacts of mining, and formulation of strategies for detecting mineral deposits.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 30
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 365  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 478 Terrigeneous Clastic Sedimentology F | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Detailed examination of depositional processes and external controls on the facies organization and sequence stratigraphy of fluvial, coastal, shelf, and deep-marine environments. Introduction to sedimentary basin types.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 26
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 238  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 481 Structural Analysis Applied to Resource Deposits W | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Applications of the principles of rock deformation to the fabric analysis of rocks in the optimization of strategies for open-ended resource exploration, resource engineering and geotechnical engineering problems. Emphasis is on fracture, fault, and vein analysis; structures in fold and thrust belts; and studies of superposed deformation and their impact on effective and economical mineral resource development. Offered next in 2011/12, and every second year thereafter.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 20
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 22
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 321  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 485 Deleted - Environmental Aqueous Geochemistry W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Examination of rock-water interaction, and the geological controls on the chemical evolution and anthropogenic modification of surface- and ground-water, as applied to environmental problems. Application of thermodynamics, activity diagrams, and computer models in the design of assessment systems and mitigation schemes for problems of water contamination. Students evaluate, and design solutions related to, case studies in the areas of geochemical hazards to human health and the environmental impacts of mining, including acid mine drainage. Offered next in 2011/12, and every second year thereafter. COURSE DELETED IN 2012/2013 ~

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOE 232  (GEOL 232) or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    GEOE 488 Geology of North America F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    An advanced course discussing the principles of earth evolution as exemplified by North America. The holistic approach illustrates the way in which integrated geodynamics, geochemistry, sedimentation, paleobiology and oceanography are used to unravel the history of the continent. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year Geological Engineering or permission of the instructor
    COREQUISITE(S): Fourth Year Geological Engineering or permission of the instructors

Geology

  
  •  

    GEOL 382 Deleted - Resource Engineering F |


    Lecture: 33
    Lab: 15
    Tutorial: 0
    Characterization of major ore deposit types using petrological, geochemical and geophysical engineering sciences, including tectonic setting, age, rock composition, geometry, mineralogy and textures, geochemical and geophysical signatures of mineral deposits. Design involves evaluation of ore deposit models and exploration programs, including ore processing and environmental issues. Laboratory work integrates investigation of mineral deposit’s samples to determine paragenetic sequences, estimation of ore grade and evaluation of issues related to ore processing and site contamination. COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 15

    PREREQUISITE(S): GEOL 235, GEOL 281 or permission of the instructor.
    EXCLUSION(S): GEOL 362


Geographic Information Science

  
  •  

    GISC 201 DELETED - Geographic Information Science W | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to the basic principles, techniques, and practical issues in assessing, accessing, and maintaining data sources and database systems and related tools for the manipulation and analysis of data. Students will learn concepts of database management and computer programming and will apply these concepts to the preparation, manipulation, analysis, and presentation of spatial and tabular data. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 4
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 6
    Engineering Science 4
    Engineering Design 6

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of the First Year Applied Science Program or permission of the Department of Geography
  
  •  

    GISC 202 DELETED - Data Collection, Management and Analysis W | 4


    Lecture: 4
    An introduction to the theory, methods, and practical issues in assessing, accessing, and maintaining data sources and database systems and related tools for the manipulation and analysis of data. Students will learn concepts of database management and computer programming and will apply these concepts to the preparation, manipulation, analysis, and presentation of spatial and tabular data. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 5
    Natural Sciences 20
    Complementary Studies 10
    Engineering Science 5
    Engineering Design 8

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of the First Year Applied Science Program or permission of the Department of Geography
  
  •  

    GISC 301 DELETED - Spatial Analysis F | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    An in-depth exploration of the spatial analysis techniques used in vector GIS. The analysis of geographic primitives of points, lines, areas and surfaces in the context of applications drawn from geography, biology, planning and related disciplines. Emphasis is placed on the use of current GIS software in a hands-on environment. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 4
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 6
    Engineering Science 4
    Engineering Design 6

    PREREQUISITE(S): GISC 201  or GISC 202  or GEOE 463  (GEOL 463) or permission of the Department of Geography
  
  •  

    GISC 302 DELETED - Environmental Modelling W | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    Study of the techniques of Geographic Information Systems and their applications in solving physical and environmental problems. Topics include data representation and models, spatial interpolation, raster-based analysis and modelling, surface models and terrain analysis, data visualization, temporal analysis, error and accuracy, and other algorithms and analytical procedures. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 4
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 6
    Engineering Science 4
    Engineering Design 6

    PREREQUISITE(S): GISC 201  or GISC 202  or GEOE 463  (GEOL 463) or the permission of the Department of Geography
  
  •  

    GISC 303 DELETED - Application Design and Customization in GIS F | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to customization of GIS and database software with an emphasis on spatial analysis tool development for desktop and Web-based GIS. Students will learn concepts of user requirements analysis, software requirements preparation, interface and software design, and computer programming while they develop customized GIS applications. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 4
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 6
    Engineering Science 4
    Engineering Design 6

    PREREQUISITE(S): GISC 201  or GISC 202  or GEOE 463  (GEOL 463) or permission of the Department of Geography

Geography

  
  •  

    GPHY 304 Arctic and Periglacial Environments W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Advanced study of the physical geography of northern regions, emphasizing the Canadian Arctic.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0


Microbiology

  
  •  

    MBIO 218 Gene Structure and Function (Molecular Biology) W | 3.25


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.25
    Molecular mechanisms of gene expression, biochemistry of nucleic acids, chromatin structure, DNA replication, RNA transcription, processing and translation in prokaryotic, eukaryotic and viral systems. Offered jointly by the Departments of Biochemistry, Biology and Microbiology and Immunology.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 39
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): BIOL 205 
  
  •  

    MICR 360 Immunology F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The general principles and mechanism of immune reaction. Immunochemical and immunobiological aspects of antibody formation and cell-mediated immunity in health and disease will be considered.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 36
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    COREQUISITE(S): BCHM 310  or BCHM 315  or BIOL 334 or equivalents or permission of the department.

Multi-department Courses

  
  •  

    MDEP 221 Deleted - Engineering and Social Justice: Critical Theories of Technological Practices W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course is intended to help students understand critical theories and to develop critical perspectives towards technology in general and engineering practices in particular and draws from sociology, history, political economics, science and technology studies and philosophy. The course is cross-disciplinary in its approach and will explore the relationship between technology, labour, industry, society, and the natural world. Students will reflect on notions of rights, justice, freedom and sustainability in human and non human arenas.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 36
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    EXCLUSION(S): SOCY 234

  
  •  

    MDEP 437 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Fuel Cell Technology F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Introduction to and history of various fuel cell systems. Fuel cell fundamentals including thermodynamics, electrode kinetics, fuel cell performance and transport issues. Systems covered include Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEMFC), Direct Methanol (DMFC), Alkaline (AFC), Solid Oxide (SOFC), and Molten Carbonate (MCFC). Fueling processing issues and combined heat and power systems. Overview of the current fuel cell industry. This course is offered by the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 21


Mechanical Engineering

  
  •  

    MECH 212 Deleted - Design Techniques |


    Physical, mental, and organizational techniques of competitive engineering design of components, machines, and products are introduced in a series of “hands-on” mini-projects. Examples include: development of alternatives; free-hand sketching in concept development and comparison; use of existing components and technologies; software applications; utilising information from handbooks, catalogs, design databases, patents, and competitive products; judgement and estimation; general design methodologies; design thinking and philosophies of design; physical modelling methods; problem-solving approaches; creative thinking; how things work; reverse engineering. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    COREQUISITE(S): APSC 161 
  
  •  

    MECH 213 Manufacturing Methods F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The objective of this course is to achieve a knowledge and understanding of a wide variety of manufacturing processes involving plastics and metals. This course forms the basis for improved product and machine design, and will assist the mechanical engineer to function in the areas of design, manufacturing and general engineering. Training in the use of machine and welding tools found in a modern job shop is a required activity practiced in the machine tool laboratory. NOTE: It is highly advised that MME students take MECH 270  concurrently with this course.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 36
    Engineering Design 18

  
  •  

    MECH 215 Instrumentation and Measurement F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course presents techniques and devices for measurements in mechanical systems of solids and fluids. On completion of the course, students will be able to: Identify and Quantify measurement objectives in practical engineering applications; Apply statistical analysis, including uncertainty for interpreting test results; Specify and Select transducers, acquisition systems, and procedures to measure temperature, pressure, stress, strain and force; position, velocity and acceleration; Apply physical principles to predict static and dynamic system performance for pressure, strain, temperature and position measurements. Students will use experimental and numerical skills typically acquired in MTHE 272  and MECH 216 .

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 112 
    COREQUISITE(S): Remove - None
  
  •  

    MECH 216 Instrumentation and Measurement Labs W | K2


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This course is composed of active lab modules that provide hands-on practical experience to complement the theory presented in MECH 215 . On completion of the course, students will be able to: Install and test a micro controller system for data acquisition and control; Acquire and process digital and analog data; Apply transducers for temperature, pressure, stress, strain and force; position, velocity and acceleration; Formulate conclusions supported by data and comparison of results to appropriate models; Discuss the limitations of data employed, key findings, trends evident, uncertainty and error; Create graphs, tables and charts to clearly present data and support conclusions; Compose technical writing to concisely report measurement results and draw valid conclusions. Students will use experimental and numerical skills typically acquired in MTHE 272  and MECH 215 .

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 8

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 112 
    COREQUISITE(S): Remove - None
  
  •  

    MECH 221 Statics and Solid Mechanics F, O/L | K 4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    Review of statics, forces and equilibrium, internal forces in simple structures; axial, torsion, shear and moment diagrams; concepts of stress and strain; mechanical properties of materials; centroids and moments of areas; axial stress; flexural stress; shear stress in shafts and beams; calculation of displacement by integration; introduction to combined loading; introduction to column buckling. This course is designed primarily for mechanical engineering students. Also Available Online.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 48
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111 and APSC 171 , or permission of instructor
    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 220 , CIVL 230  

  
  •  

    MECH 228 Kinematics and Dynamics W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course will cover the following topics in the field of dynamics. Kinematics of particles: planar motion (rectilinear, curvilinear), choosing a coordinate system, conversions between systems, space curvilinear motion, free and constrained paths, relative motion between particles. Plane kinematics of rigid bodies: absolute motion, relative motion (velocity and acceleration), instantaneous centre of zero velocity, motion relative to rotating axes. Kinetics of systems of particles: generalized Newton’s Second Law, work and energy, impulse and momentum, conservation of energy and momentum, impact.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 31
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111 , APSC 171 
    COREQUISITE(S): (None - remove)
  
  •  

    MECH 230 Thermodynamics I F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introductory course in thermodynamics. Topics include: properties and behaviour of pure substances, concepts of heat, work and energy, the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics, and the analysis of a variety of power and refrigeration cycles.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 30
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 241 Fluid Mechanics I W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introductory course in fluid mechanics. Topics include properties of fluids, fluids at rest, manometers and other pressure measuring devices, dimensional analysis, the laws of conservation of mass and momentum, Bernoulli’s equation for incompressible flow and the energy equation, flow measurements, elementary pipe flow problems including losses, pumps, etc. On completion of the course students will be able to: Explain Bernoulli based energy equations with reference to energy and hydraulic grade lines, static and dynamic pressure; Explain control volume and control mass analysis with reference to Eulerian and Lagrangian frames, applied forces and flows; Solve simple flow systems for velocity distributions using continuity and Navier Stokes equations with appropriate boundary conditions; Solve flow and force problems in an integral framework using Bernoulli, conservation of mass and momentum; Solve piping system performance problems using Bernoulli with friction, minor losses, pump and turbine performance curves; Calculate pressures and forces on submerged surfaces in a static fluid; Solve scaling problems using dimensionless groups.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111 
  
  •  

    MECH 270 Materials Science and Engineering F | 3.75


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.25
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides the student with a background in the basic structural concepts of materials and the relationships between processing, structure, properties and performance. The topics will range from atomic bonding and arrangements, through micro-and macro-structures and their influence on properties, to the processing techniques required to produce the desired structures. All current types of engineering materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites and semiconductors are covered. There is an experimental laboratory to illustrate the principles presented in the course along with some ASTM testing techniques.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 33
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 271 Deleted - Materials Science and Engineering |


    The lecture material is similar to that in MECH 270  but there is no laboratory component. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 321 Solid Mechanics II F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course continues the study of solid mechanics that was introduced in second year. On completion of the course students will be able to: Calculate the total normal and shear stress at a point and sketch the stress distributions on a cross-section of a structural component (such as a crank) experiencing 3D combined (axial, transverse and/or moment causing) loads and non-symmetric loads; Calculate the residual normal or shear stress at a point and sketch the stress distribution on a cross-section of a structural component that is experiencing axial, torsional and/or bending loads followed by unloading; Calculate the normal or shear stress at a point on a cross-section of a structural component that is under load (axial, torsional and/or bending) and is supported in a statically indeterminate configuration (using force balance equations together with compatibility equations derived from known boundary conditions); Calculate the normal or shear stress at a point on a cross-section of a structural component that is under load (axial, torsional and/or bending) and contains one or more locations of stress concentration; Calculate, using general equations and/or graphically using a Mohr’s circle, the normal and shear stress and/or strain transformations at a point within a structural component under load as a function of the orientation relative to a fixed coordinate system and find the maximum in-plane normal and shear stress and/or strain; Calculate the deflections and angles of deflection at any point on a transversely loaded beam of uniform cross-section using the principle of superposition and the standard equations for single loads acting on simply supported beams; Solve for critical loads in terms of buckling for concentrically and eccentrically loaded columns; Calculate the optimum dimensions (design) for shafts and beams under combined 3D loading based on specified material failure criteria; Design mechanism or structural components to withstand all forces for given loads, maximum deflection tolerances, factor of safety and material properties. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 220  or MECH 221  
  
  •  

    MECH 323 Machine Design W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course emphasises the application of theoretical and engineering background taught in other courses, but also relies heavily on empirical approaches and simplifications of theory. Core material includes static and fatigue failure theories and the design/specification of selected machine elements. The course is centered around a major design project which is undertaken in groups.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 27
    Engineering Design 27

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200  OR MECH 212 , MECH 321 , APSC 221  or MTHE 334 
  
  •  

    MECH 328 Dynamics and Vibration F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course covers the kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions, as well as an introduction to vibrations. Topics in dynamics include: mathematically rigorous kinematic analysis, Newton’s laws, energy methods, impulse and momentum methods, mass moments of inertia, and gyroscopic motion. Topics in vibrations include: free and forced vibration of single-degree-of-freedom systems, undamped and damped systems, equivalent single degree of freedom system of continuous elements/systems using energy equivalence and equation of motion.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 17
    Engineering Design 14

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 228 
  
  •  

    MECH 330 Applied Thermodynamics II F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    A continuation of MECH 230  with selected topics such as gas and vapour power cycles, refrigeration, mixtures of gases and vapours, combustion and available energy.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 230  or ENPH 274  (PHYS 274)
  
  •  

    MECH 333 Gender, Engineering and Technology W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course examines relations between gender and technology. The main topics covered are: the role of technology on the shaping of society particularly in terms of gendering of jobs and exclusion of women, gender issues in the workplace, and the impact of technology on women’s lives. Historical perspectives are presented and contemporary examples from western and developing countries are discussed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 36
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 341 Fluid Mechanics II W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    A second course in fluid mechanics covering the differential form of conservation laws, boundary layer and external flows, compressible flows and the operation of rotational fluid machinery. On completion of the course students will be able to: Apply control volume analysis to mass, momentum and energy conservation; Apply differential form of mass and momentum conservation to the concept of flow field and its properties, including Navier Stokes equations; Apply stream function and velocity potential to the analysis of two-dimensional inviscid flows, and use the superposition principle to build complex flow fields from building block ingredients; Calculate drag and lift on solid bodies such as airfoils; Explain boundary layer flows, including the concept of various boundary layer thicknesses, shape factor, flow separation and the difference between laminar and turbulent boundary layers; Explain compressible flow features based on one-dimensional compressible subsonic and supersonic flows, with and without normal shock waves; Calculate design parameters of rotational fluid machinery, including centrifugal pumps and wind turbines.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 11
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 31
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 241 
  
  •  

    MECH 346 Heat Transfer W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introductory course which covers conduction, convection and radiation modes of heat transfer. Both analytical and numerical analysis will be discussed, and concepts will be reinforced through tutorial and laboratory sessions. Latter topics will include combined modes of heat transfer and the design of heat exchangers.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 230  or ENPH 274  (PHYS 274) and MECH 241  or MECH 341 
  
  •  

    MECH 350 Automatic Control W | 3.5


    Lecture: 2.75
    Lab: 0.25
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introduction to the basic principles of modelling, analysis and control of dynamic systems. Topics include: modes of control, principles of feedback, Laplace and transfer functions, transient response of first and second order systems, stability criteria, root locus, Bode and frequency response. After completion of this course a student will be able to design a control system by classical techniques and will have an awareness of modern techniques.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 23
    Engineering Design 19

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 224  (MATH 224) or MTHE 225  (MATH 225) or MATH 226 and MECH 328 , or ENPH 211  (PHYS 211) and ENPH 225  (PHYS 225)
  
  •  

    MECH 361 Project Based Engineering: Conceive, Design, Implement and Operate W | K3.5


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course provides academic credit for 3rd year students who take a lead role in design and implementation of an engineering device of substantial complexity that is part of a student project. The student has to demonstrate significant involvement with the project during the Fall term and be recommended by an academic advisor in order to qualify and be approved by the course coordinator. Students who are permitted to take this course will be required to “conceive, design, implement and operate” a sub-system or complete competition entry using the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier courses. Successful course completion will consist of specification of function, analysis, selection of materials and/or components, preparation of working drawings, manufactured prototype, completed with a major report and poster presentation. The evaluation will be based on joint assessment by the project academic advisor and the course coordinator.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 2nd Year and permission of the course coordinator upon the recommendation by the academic advisor.
  
  •  

    MECH 370 Principles of Materials Processing F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The basic mechanisms of mass transport and phase transformations in materials are developed from thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Topics include phase equilibria, diffusion, solidification and solid-state transformations. The application of these phenomena to materials processing methods, such as casting, forming, heat treatment and sintering is described.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 18
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 270  or MECH 271 
  
  •  

    MECH 371 Fracture Mechanics and Dislocation Theory W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Fracture Mechanics are developed to explain crack propagation in materials and structures. This includes development of the strain energy release rate (GIC) and the critical stress intensity factor (KIC). Emphasis will be placed on developing the correlation between microstructure control and the resistance to crack propagation which this variable produces. Dislocation theory will be evoked to analyse the stress fields of point, line and plane defects. Plasticity and fracture will be detailed, which includes the time dependent aspects of such processes as static fatigue and creep fracture.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 270  or MECH 271 
  
  •  

    MECH 391 Deleted - Technical Communication - Advanced |


    This course provides advanced instruction and practice in effective technical writing (individual and team writing) and editing. Some exercises will be linked to required technical communication tasks in other courses. Open to Mechanical and Materials Engineering students only. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 292  or MECH 290
  
  •  

    MECH 393 Biomechanical Product Development F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course focuses on design, manufacturing and product management of various implantable biomechanical devices, such as artificial joints, ligaments and various other external devices for persons with disabilities. Some aspects, such as the determination of the geometry and different sizes for artificial joints are product specific, while safety criteria, standards, rational choice of alternatives, design procedures and product management are applicable when designing a much larger variety of products. Much of the theory will be based on examples of artificial joints, and on external devices and instruments.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 24

  
  •  

    MECH 396 Mechanical and Materials Engineering Laboratory I F | K3


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This is the first of two laboratory courses in the third year of the Materials Option of the Mechanical Engineering program.  Lecture topics and course assignments are selected to provide the background required to undertake the laboratory work.  In alternate weeks, material from current capstone projects and recent national/international news is presented and analyzed on a professional, legal, social, ethical, and economic basis.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 2nd year or permission of the instructor.
    COREQUISITE(S): MECH 370  
    EXCLUSION(S): MECH 398  

  
  •  

    MECH 397 Mechanical and Materials Engineering Laboratory II W | K2


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This is the second of two laboratory courses in the third year of the Materials Option of the Mechanical Engineering program. Lecture topics and course assignments are selected to provide the background required to undertake the laboratory work. Approximately half of the material is common with MECH 399 .

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 2nd year or permission of the instructor
    COREQUISITE(S): MECH 371 
    EXCLUSION(S): MECH 399 

  
  •  

    MECH 398 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory I F | K3


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This is the first of two laboratory courses in the third year of the General Option of the Mechanical Engineering program. Lecture topics and course assignments are selected to provide the background required to undertake the laboratory work. Lab modules from MECH 396 /MECH 397 /MECH 399  completed but not counted for credit may be included for credit in this course. In alternate weeks, material from current capstone projects and national/international news is presented and analyzed on a professional, legal, social, ethical, and economic basis.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 2nd year or permission of the instructor.
    EXCLUSION(S): MECH 396  

  
  •  

    MECH 399 Mechanical Engineering Laboratory II W | K2


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This is the second of two laboratory courses in the third year of the General Option of the Mechanical Engineering program. Lecture topics and course assignments are selected to provide the background required to undertake the laboratory work. Lab modules from MECH 396 /MECH 397 /MECH 398  completed but not counted for credit may be included for credit in this course.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 2nd year or permission of the instructor.
    EXCLUSION(S): MECH 397 

  
  •  

    MECH 420 Vibrations W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Considers mechanical vibration, the problems it presents and the means of dealing with it. Completes the treatment of systems with two degrees-of-freedom (introduced in MECH 328 ) and proceeds to systems with higher number of degrees-of-freedom. Co-ordinate systems, types of coupling, matrix formulation, vibration absorbers and dampers, specific and hysteretic damping, Rayleigh’s method, torsional vibration, Holzer method, introduction to the finite element method, beam vibration.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 29
    Engineering Design 13

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 328  or ENPH 211  (PHYS 211) and ENPH 225  (PHYS 225)
  
  •  

    MECH 423 Introduction to Microsystems F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course will deal with the practical engineering aspects of micro-machining technologies and microsystems. The contents will include: scaling issues, microfabrication technologies and production methods, classification and analysis of Microsystems (including microsensors, microactuators, RF switches, micromirrors, and other micromechanisms), the integration of devices into Microsystems (both assembly and interfacing). Micro-machining will be compared and contrasted to both micro-electronics and traditional macro-machining. The development and use of Microsystems simulation and design tools will be covered as well.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 25
    Engineering Design 17

  
  •  

    MECH 424 Sustainable Product Design W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course deals with sustainable product design and manufacture. Topics include: product Life Cycle Analysis issues; Streamlined Life Cycle Analysis and international Life Cycle Analysis standards; Energy, Global Warming Potential, Green House Gas and carbon emission issues (including energy needs in product design and manufacturing); Carbon footprint, basic chemistry of carbon emissions, international standards for carbon emissions signatures. Design topics include: product design for manunfacture and assembly, design for disassembly and design for environment. Product end-of-life considerations include: recycling, remanufacture and reuse. Students will complete several open ended projects. Guest speakers will be included where possible.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 323  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 430 Thermal Systems Design F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1
    This course is concerned with the technical, economic and environmental aspects of conventional and novel methods of energy supply and use. Emphasis will be placed on the analysis and design of thermal systems. Topics include: electric utility demand and supply; the analysis of thermal power generation systems including combined cycle and cogeneration plants; emission control; alternative energy systems. A group project related to the design of a thermal system will form a significant portion of this course. NOTE: Limited enrollment.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 24

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 330 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 435 Internal Combustion Engines F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.08
    Tutorial: 0.42
    This course covers all aspects of the design and operation of internal combustion engines. Principles of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics are used in the analysis of internal combustion engines. Course content includes discussions on both spark ignition and compression ignition (diesel) engines with special emphasis placed on new engine technologies. Intake, in-cylinder and exhaust flows are considered along with various aspects of combustion phenomenon relevant to engines. This course includes a laboratory involving engine performance measurements made using a dynamometer.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 230  or CHEE 210  
  
  •  

    MECH 439 Turbomachinery F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Fluid mechanics and thermodynamics applied to turbomachines; dimensionless performance characteristics; momentum and energy equations; thermodynamics and efficiencies; cascade aerodynamics; compressors and turbines, reaction and stage loading; radial equilibrium; radial flow machines; application of generalized performance to choice of compressors; mechanical details and auxiliary systems.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 330 , MECH 341 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 441 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Fluid Mechanics III W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Topics will include: Derivation of equations of motion for incompressible fluids; exact solutions for laminar flows; stability and transition; introduction to turbulence, including turbulent boundary layers, jets, wakes and mixing layers; drag reduction; introduction to the modelling of turbulence.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 341  
  
  •  

    MECH 444 Computational Fluid Dynamics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides an overview of, and hands-on experience in, the numerical modelling of fluid flows. Finite volume, finite difference and finite elements methods are introduced. Students are expected to gain critical insight into the capabilities and limitations of fluid flow models by numerically simulating various engineering flows and by doing a term project. Topics include: comparison of numerical, experimental and analytical methods in fluid mechanics, numerical grids and their generation, flow equations and their discretization, solution techniques, turbulence modelling and data presentation. Features of commercial codes are critically reviewed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 272  (MATH 272) or ENPH 213  (PHYS 213), MECH 341  
  
  •  

    MECH 448 Compressible Fluid Flow F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Introduction and review of work done in earlier courses; basic equations for one-dimensional compressible flow; isentropic one-dimensional flow; steady and unsteady normal shock waves; oblique shock waves; steady and unsteady expansion waves; two-dimensional isentropic flow; nozzle flows; effects of friction and heat transfer; boundary layer flow; design of aircraft engine intake systems; design of supersonic wind-tunnels and shock tubes.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 31
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 341 
  
  •  

    MECH 452 Mechatronics Engineering F | 5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 2.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This is a course in mechatronic systems design. Mechatronics Engineering, an integration of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering, is studied in a seris of workshops that focus on electronics, microcontrollers, programmable logic controllers and mobile robots. The lectures provide the theoretical background to the workshops, and include discussion of related industrial and commercial applications. The knowledge and experience gained in the lectures and workshops is applied to a team design project.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 30

    PREREQUISITE(S): ELEC 252  or ELEC 310  or ENPH 333  or ENPH 334 , and MECH 350  or MTHE 332 , and permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 455 Computer Integrated Manufacturing W | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The course will focus on the integration of facilities (machine tools, robotics) and the automation protocols required in the implementation of computer integrated manufacturing. Specific concepts addressed include flexible manufacturing systems (FMS); interfaces between computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing systems; islands of automation.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 21

  
  •  

    MECH 456 Introduction to Robotics W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course will cover the following topics in the field of robotics: historical development; robot components (sensors, actuators, and end effectors, and their selection criteria); basic categories of robots (serial and parallel manipulators, mobile robots); mobility/constraint analysis; workspace analysis; rigid body kinematics (homogeneous transformation, angle and axis of rotation, Euler angles, roll-pitch-yaw angles, cylindrical and spherical coordinates); manipulator kinematics and motion trajectories (displacement and velocity analyses, differential relations, Jacobian matrix); non-redundant and redundant sensing/actuation of manipulators; manipulator statics (force and stiffness); singularities; and manipulator dynamics.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 21

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 350  or MTHE 332  (MATH 332) or ELEC 443  or permission of the instructor
    EXCLUSION(S): ELEC 448  

  
  •  

    MECH 458 DELETED - Machine Condition Monitoring and Fault Diagnostics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.17
    Tutorial: 0.33
    The primary objective of this course is to introduce students to the dynamic behaviour of rotating machinery (but other machinery classes will also be included) and to discuss appropriate fault and mechanical deterioration detection and diagnostic criteria and schemes for various applications. Emphasis will be placed on the application of vibration based methods of data acquisition and analysis techniques. There will be a laboratory component that will provide the students with demonstrations and the opportunity to collect and analyze vibration data from a set of mechanical fault simulators. Topics will include, but not be limited to; basic maintenance philosophies and strategies, vibration signal measurement and recording instrumentation, dynamic signal analysis and display, vibration level standards, rotating machinery balancing, shaft alignment, rolling element and journal bearing faults, gear wear detection and case studies. Correlation of infra-red thermography, oil analysis and other methods of fault detection and diagnostic techniques with vibration based methods will also be discussed. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 28
    Engineering Design 14

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 328  or ENPH 321  (PHYS 321)
  
  •  

    MECH 460 Team Project - Conceive and Design F | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    Students working in teams will be required to “conceive and design” a product, system or process using the knowledge and skills acquired in earlier courses. Elements of the design will include: specification of function, analysis, selection of materials and/or components, preparation of working drawings, cost analysis and tenders, and preparation of preliminary design report. A research project may be accepted as an engineering design project provided it can be clearly shown that the elements of “conceive and design” are fulfilled in the completion of the project. Lectures and Guest Speakers will focus on related professional skills and topics including engineering ethics, professional organizations and legislation, intellectual property and information systems in support of the project.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 48

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 321 , MECH 323 , MECH 328 , MECH 346  and MECH 350 , or in final year of MECH program.
    COREQUISITE(S): MECH 464  
  
  •  

    MECH 461 Research Project W | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course provides an opportunity for students to work individually on an engineering research project with staff members of the Department. The topic is selected by the student in consultation with a Department supervising faculty member by the end of the Fall term. The projects are laboratory-based to be completed by the end of the Winter term with a major report and presentation of the work.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 48
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year and permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MECH 462 Team Project - Implement and Operate W | K3.5


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course is intended to enable team projects that started in MECH 460 , to continue to the “implement and operate” phases of the design cycle. However, new projects can be the subject of MECH 462 as long as they meet the “implement and operate” objectives of the course. An engineering report is prepared and defended. The presentation is normally supported by a working prototype or physical mock-up of the design. Testing a process or system can replace the building of a prototype.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 460  and permission of instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 463 Engineering Project for International Students F/W | K 2


    Lecture: No
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: No
    This course is for students registered at a university outside Canada who wish to do a research project at Queen’s to satisfy the requirements of their home university. Projects must be initiated by a faculty supervisor at the student’s home university in consultation with a Queen’s professor who has agreed to act as a supervisor. The time frame and requirements for course completion will be agreed upon by the two project supervisors prior to the student arriving at Queen’s. This course is NOT available or intended for typical exchange agreement students.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 24

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MECH 464 Communications and Project Management F | 1.5


    Lecture: 0.75
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.75
    This course provides advanced instruction and practice in technical communication and project management for multidisciplinary engineering projects. Content includes request for proposals, project planning and proposal writing, quality function deployment, oral presentation skills, client communications and concise report writing. Course deliverables are closely tied to deliverables in Capstone design courses. Open to Mechanical and Materials Engineering students only.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 18
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    COREQUISITE(S): MECH 460  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 465 Computer-Aided Design F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Concept of computational design including the choice of the objective function, equality and inequality constraints, and analysis methods; one-dimensional search methods, sensitivity analysis, and the steepest descent method. The principles of the finite element method and its application to stress analysis of mechanical components. NOTE: Enrolment is limited.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 31

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 470 Deformation Processing W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.17
    Tutorial: 0.33
    This course focuses on the elastic-plastic deformation of metals as it relates to the fabrication of stock materials, the manufacture of components and in-service material performance. Methods for describing and analyzing elastic-plastic behaviour, at both macroscopic and microscopic length-scales, are presented. Additional topics include the measurement and prediction of forming limits, the effects of deformation rate and temperature on plastic flow, and mechanisms of ductile failure. In the final portion of the course, the concept of microstructural design is introduced and then reinforced through a series of case studies.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 371 
  
  •  

    MECH 474 Deleted - Functional Ceramics |


    This course is designed to provide an understanding of the relationship between composition, defect structure and electrical and thermal properties of functional ceramics. Emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of conduction in insulators, semiconductor ceramics and fast ionic conductors. The origin of ferroelectricity and piezoelectricity is presented for isotropic and anisotropic materials using tensors and matrix notations. Several ceramic systems and related devices are presented, including electronic and ionic conductors, ferroelectrics and dielectric materials. The design and operation of modern electrical/electronic devices, such as solid oxide fuel cells, varistors and smart structures, are discussed in detail. The breadth and importance of this class of ceramics in modern electronic industries are reviewed. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 370 
  
  •  

    MECH 475 Deleted - Structural Ceramics |


    The course deals with processing, structure and properties of advanced ceramics possessing a combination of properties not found in other classes of materials. Emphasis is placed on understanding the brittle nature of ceramics through the concept of linear-elastic fracture mechanics. The relationship between microstructure (eg. grain size, porosity and phase content) and mechanical properties (eg. strength, toughness and hardness) is developed using crack opening displacement analysis. The role of anisotropy and residual stresses in the development of high strength ceramics and structures is also discussed. Different mechanisms for the sintering of advanced structural ceramics are also covered along with forming and densification of high performance carbides, nitrides and oxides. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 28
    Engineering Design 14

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 371 
  
  •  

    MECH 476 Engineering of Polymers and Composite Materials W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course introduces the microstructure-property-processing relationships needed to understand the applicability of polymers and composites to engineering design. The courses start with an introduction to the structure and properties of different polymers. The mechanics of polymers are covered including elasticity, rubber elasticity, pressure dependent yield and viscoelasticity. The mechanics of composites depend not only on the matrix, but also on the reinforcing phase. While focussing on polymer composites, metal and ceramic-based composites will also be introduced. Topics covered will include the influence of the interface, mechanical and transport properties and design of composites. The final goal is to correlate constitutive relations describing the time-temperature dependence of mechanical properties of polymers and composites to microstructure and linking these relations to practical design.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 370 , MECH 371  
  
  •  

    MECH 478 Biomaterials W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introduction to the structure, properties and performance of biomaterials used for the construction of medical devices. Examples of biomaterials are bioactive ceramics, biodegradable polymers and advanced titanium-based alloys used for the construction of orthopedic implants. Topics covered will include surface and bulk properties of biomaterials and their impact on the clinical performance of implants. Discussion will focus on tissue-biomaterials interactions, biocompatibility and biodegradation. The course will also cover the current in-vitro and in-vivo testing methods for evaluating the long-term performance of biomaterials.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 31

  
  •  

    MECH 479 Nano-Structured Materials F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The majority of conventional materials have grain or crystallite sizes ranging from micrometers to several millimeters. Capabilities now exist to synthesize materials with grains where one or more dimension is on the nanoscale (less than 100 nm). As the grain size decreases, there is a significant increase in the volume fraction of grain boundaries or interfaces. This characteristic strongly influences the chemical and physical properties of the materials. For example, nanostructured ceramics are tougher and stronger than coarser grained ceramics, while nanostructured metals exhibit increases in yield strength and elastic modulus. It has also been shown that other properties (e.g. electrical, optical and magnetic) are influenced by a fine grain structure. The goal of this course is to introduce the student to the impact of length scale, from millimeter to nanometer, on material properties, with a primary but not exclusive focus on mechanical properties. It will include discussions on synethesis approaches as well as examples of applications.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 370 , MECH 371  
  
  •  

    MECH 480 Airplane Aerodynamics and Performance W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    A technical course on the principles of flight. Techniques for the quantitative prediction of the aerodynamic characteristics of the wing will be described. Extensions to account for real-world effects will be discussed. These results will be used to predict the airplane performance (range, climb rate, maximum speed, etc.) The concept aerodynamic stability will be introduced and discussed. Students are expected to know MATLAB proficiently and have fluids knowledge typically acquired in MECH 241  and MECH 341 . Those who have not taken these or similar courses will need to prepare through self study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 481 Wind Energy F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introductory course on wind-turbine operation and aerodynamics. Topics include: the Betz limit; the Blade Element Momentum method; characteristics of the atmospheric boundary layer; unsteady aerodynamic theory; gusts and blade aeroelasticity; blade noise and health effects; and wind-park siting and planning. Extension of some of these topics to small wind turbines, run-of-the-river water turbines and off-grid systems will also be presented. Students are expected to have sufficient experience with fluid dynamics equivalent to MECH 341 . Those who have not taken such a course will need to prepare through self-study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 482 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Noise Control W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introduction to the principles of noise control. Topics include: basic properties of sound and noise, the measurement of noise, effects of noise on people, description of sound fields, acoustics of rooms and enclosures, acoustical materials and structures, and noise source identification. A coherent approach to the solution of noise control problems is stressed throughout the course.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 25
    Engineering Design 17

  
  •  

    MECH 483 Nuclear Materials W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    A nuclear reactor presents a unique environment in which materials must perform. In addition to the high temperatures and stresses to which materials are subjected in conventional applications, nuclear materials are subjected to various kinds of radiation which affect their performance, and often this dictates a requirement for a unique property (for example, a low cross section for thermal neutron absorption) that is not relevant in conventional applications. The effects of the radiation may be direct (e.g., the displacement of atoms form their normal positions by fast neutrons or fission fragments), or indirect (e.g., a more aggressive chemical environment caused by radiolytic decomposition). This course describes materials and structures typically used in nuclear environments, their manufacture, the unique conditions to which they are subjected, the basic physical phenomena that affect their performance and the resulting design and operational requirements for reactor components. The course includes a field trips to components manufacturers and to Canada’s national nuclear research laboratory.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 370 , MECH 371 
  
  •  

    MECH 484 Introduction to Ceramics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    An introduction to the processing, structure and properties of advanced ceramics used for the design of components in electronic, automotive, aerospace, energy, mining and chemical and petrochemical industries. The emphasis is placed on understanding the relationship between microstructure and mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of ceramics. Ceramic systems and related devices which are discussed include electronic and ionic conductors, capacitors, transducers, varistors, and dielectric substartes. The effect of porosity, grain size and residual stresses on strength, elastic and fracture properties of isotropic and anisotropic ceramics is also discussed. Material transport mechanism and sintering of powder ceramics materials is covered with recent examples of forming and sintering of oxides, carbides and nitrides.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 370  and MECH 371 
  
  •  

    MECH 492 Biofluids F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course presents some of the applications of fluid mechanics in human biomechanical systems. The course centres on the human circulatory and respiratory systems. Topics covered will include: blood flow in the heart, arteries, veins and microcirculation; air flow in the lungs and airways; mass transfer across the walls of these systems. Experimental tools for use in biomedical applications will be emphasized. Students are expected to have experimental and fluids knowledge typically acquired in MECH 215 /MECH 241 /MECH 341 . Those who have not taken these or similar courses will need to prepare through self study. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MECH 494 Kinematics of Human Motion F | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    In this course students will explore the application of classical mechanics to the analysis of human motion related to athletics, orthopaedics, and rehabilitation. The course covers the structure of human joints, including experimental and analytical techniques in the study of human joint kinematics; applications to the design of artificial joints and to clinical diagnosis and treatments. Students are introduced to the motion capabilities of the human body and how to develop and study kinematic models of the individual joints of the human body. Experimental methods used to collect kinematic data will be studied through interactive labs. Topics include defining body position and displacement, three dimensional representation of human motion, basic functional anatomy of individual joints, rigid body kinematics (homogeneous transformations, Euler angles, helical axis), intrajoint kinematics, joint modelling, articular surface motion. Three-dimensional kinematics of individual joints is emphasized from the perspective of total joint replacement design.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 30

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 393  or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 495 Ergonomics and Design W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides an overview of ergonomic problems that are addressed in engineering design; including biomechanical, physical and physiological issues. Case studies will range from the design of vehicle cockpits to process control rooms, from industrial manual materials handling tasks to human directed robots, and from domestic tools to biomechanical devices.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 323  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MECH 496 Musculoskeletal Biomechanics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Introduction to musculoskeletal biomechanics, including experimental and analytical approaches to movement analysis, experimental instrumentation and devices, and biomechanical devices for musculoskeletal disorder rehabilitations. Analysis of the contribution of external loading, forces generated by muscles and constraints provided by other musculoskeletal structures to predict forces and stresses in musculoskeletal joints and tissues. Numerical and modelling approaches, including inverse dynamics, and optimization, and determination of segmental inertial properties. Biomechanical devices including upper limb and lower limb orthotics and prosthetics. Applications in orthopaedic engineering, movement assessment, ergonomics, joint injury and replacements, and biomechanical system design.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 22

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 220  or MECH 221 , MECH 328 , MECH 393  or permission of the instructor
 

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