Sep 18, 2020  
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED 
    
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


 

Mining Engineering

  
  •  

    MINE 201 Introduction to Mining and Mineral Processing F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1
    This course presents and overview of all aspects of mining from exploration, financing, development and mining operations. Underground and open pit mining are contrasted. Mineral processing systems for the production of gold, diamonds, copper, nickel, zinc and iron will be studied. Topics include decision-making process related to world market commodity pricing, mine planning and design, mining equipment, blasting and environmental considerations. Concepts of sustainability from economic, social and environmental perspective will be explored. Case studies, a major field trip and related assessment will be used to illustrate principles taught and how they are applied in a practical situation.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 36
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): must be enrolled in Mining Engineering, or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 202 Computer Applications and Instrumentation in Mining F | 1.5


    Lecture: 0
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    This lab applies commonly used computer applications to mining engineering problems and conducts experiments with instrumentation used in surface and underground mining and mineral processing. A major field trip in conjunction with MINE 201  will be used to illustrate principles taught and how they are applied in mining operations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 6

    COREQUISITE(S): MINE 201 
  
  •  

    MINE 244 Underground Mining W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    A study of underground mining technology with special reference to economic optimization in both design and production. Conventional and up to date mining methods are reviewed. Developments and trends in mining methods are closely analyzed. Mine design is studied in relation to ore reserves, tonnage and grade distribution, equipment with emphasis on the growing importance of maintenance on underground machinery and capacities of various production units. Development and production costs associated with mining are an inherent aspect of this course. The problems and possibilities of existing and evolving mining techniques are reviewed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 20

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 201 
  
  •  

    MINE 262 Deleted - Engineering Surveying S | 3.5


    Lecture: 1.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 2
    This introductory course in plane surveying consists of about 16 hours of lectures, the rest of the time being spent in the field. Lecture material includes distance measurement, differential, profile and indirect leveling and use of transit, traversing and mapping. Errors, corrections and balancing are also discussed. The use of available software packages for the reduction and calculation of data is encouraged throughout the course. In the field, students practice the basic techniques of instrument use through various assignments. Careful and efficient handling of instruments and proper note-keeping are stressed. The use of state-of-the-art electronic surveying instruments is included in the field assignments wherever possible. The school is held on campus immediately following the final First Year examination in April. - COURSE DELETED 2013-2014

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 40
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Must be enrolled in Mining Engineering
    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 211

  
  •  

    MINE 267 Applied Chemistry for Mining W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides an overview of the chemistry of inorganic and organic compounds used in the practice of mining and mineral processing including hydro-and pyro-extractive methods. Chemistry and chemical interactions for selected reagent formulations used in blasting, flotation/flocculation, leaching/precipitation, solvent extraction/electrowinning and pollution control technologies are outlined with relevant stoichiometry. Mineral stability and its relevance to metal extraction is discussed. Unary, binary and ternary phase diagrams are explored. The properties of solutions of interest are reviewed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 131 
    COREQUISITE(S): MINE 268  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 268 Analytical Methods in Mining W | 1


    Lecture: 0
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    This course exposes the students to the analytical techniques utilized in the mining and the mineral processing industries. The first part of each laboratory includes the principles of the analytical technique while the second part is concerned with the practical use of the technique. The analytical techniques are typical of those of analytical groups in most mining companies. The techniques studied include: sampling, digestion, Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy, Induction Coupled Plasma Spectroscopy, X-Ray Diffraction and fire assay. Safety in handling of hazardous chemicals is emphasized with a review of selected Material Safety Data Sheets and industry standards.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 3
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 131 
    COREQUISITE(S): MINE 267 
  
  •  

    MINE 307 Front Line Supervision W | 1.5


    Lecture: 1.25
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.25
    This short course provides a base for engineering graduates placed into leadership positions in mining organizations. The Supervisor role is defined, core duties of the position are examined and students are given a variety of tools or strategies to achieve the defined goals of the role. Students are exposed to basic principles of leadership particularly coaching techniques and motivation. Safety leadership is hightlighted and reinforced extensively throughout the material, most importantly the Supervisor’s direct responsibility for ensuring compliance with Safe Operating Procedure and associated Safety norms. The Supervisor’s influence in meaningfully contributing to an organization’s safety and performance culture is examined and discussed. Important aspects of Performance Management for both individuals and groups are covered with examples from real-life situations. Several cases involving direct and indirect costs associated with situations directly controlled by the Supervisor are studied to reinforce the key link nature of the position. Course material also deals with the subject of change in the workplace and includes strategies for managing it; how a Supervisor can best facilitate change that results in a positive outcome. Detailed discussions are held on common problems facing Supervisors and a simple problem solving methodology is provided along with examples. Course facilitators are experienced mining professionals with a history that includes front-line supervision up to executive positions; all material is reinforced with real-life examples. Students are graded on a pass/fail system. Offered as an intensive 2-day short course in the winter term.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 18
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S):  Must have completed the 2nd year of Mining Engineering 
  
  •  

    MINE 321 Drilling and Blasting F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    This course deals with the principles of commercial explosives technology and the application of blasting in mining and construction. The planning, design, economic considerations and trends of drilling and blasting practices in the different segments of the mining and construction industries are considered. Topics covered are detonation theory, performance and sensitivity of explosives, fragmentation prediction measurement and control, vibrations from blasting, air blast, damage and special blasting techniques used in perimeter blasting and blast design methods.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 14
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 40
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 367  or CHEE 209 
  
  •  

    MINE 324 Hydraulics for Mining Applications W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The fluid mechanics basic to fluid hydraulic systems used in the mineral industry are introduced. Topics covered include properties of fluids, fluid statics and its application to mining. Hydrodynamic studies include the energy balance and Bernoulli’s equation, energy losses in incompressible flow, the momentum equation and its application, and flow and pressure measuring devices. Flow in closed conduits, including series and parallel pipeline systems and pipe networks, is studied in detail and open channel flow is introduced. Applications include industrial pumps, sump design, hydraulic structures, underground mine dewatering systems, open pit mine drainage systems, and mine backfill and mine tailings transportation.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 225  and MECH 230  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 325 Applied Rock Mechanics W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    This course deals with the principles of solid mechanics as applied to geologic materials in order to examine the effects of stress, strain and other factors on the geomechanical responses of such materials to these influences. Topics covered include rheological behaviour of rocks, stress measurement and prediction, and measurement procedures for determination of rock strength and other characteristic parameters. Failure theories are discussed and used to describe fracture development and design considerations for underground and surface mine structures. Analytical techniques based on empirical knowledge and supported by available theory and engineering practice are presented, including, for example: slope stability, underground structure and rock foundation design; the influences of ground water, rockbursts and backfill support on structural stability of excavations; and discussion of potential hazards associated with each. The operation and design of instrumentation used for rock mechanics studies are also discussed. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 54
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 230  and MINE 202  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 326 Operations Research W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The course deals with the application of operations research methods in engineering with emphasis on mining applications. Topics covered are linear programming, optimization methods, transportation and network models, discrete optimization, non linear optimization, decision tree methods, simulation and elements of geostatistics as applied to mining. Lab sessions also deal with forecasting techniques, regression analysis, dispatch problems, planning and scheduling.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 20
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 20

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 142  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 330 Mineral Industry Economics W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course for students in Mining Engineering and allied disciplines will apply basic principles of economic evaluation learned in APSC 221  to the minerals industry. Topics covered include: the project definition and economic evaluation process; economic analysis tools and techniques; taxation; inflation; cost estimation; the nature of mineral supply and demand; mineral commodity markets and pricing; uncertainty and risks associated with the mining industry, their analysis and incorporation into the evaluation process. Assignments, examples, and tutorials reflect a variety of situations and challenges faced in the evaluation of exploration and mine development opportunities, as well as important applications to mining and mineral processing design and decision-making.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 221 , must be enrolled in Mining Engineering or they must have or the permission of the instructor (or department)
  
  •  

    MINE 331 Methods of Mineral Separation F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Mineral separation processes of a physical and physicochemical nature are studied with laboratory sessions. Topics include size reduction, classification, flotation, flocculation, gravity concentration, magnetic, electrostatic separations and dewatering. Surface phenomena involving fine particle processing, reagent classifications, flotation machines and circuits, plant practice in ore flotation are discussed. The laboratory practice includes a design project on flotation circuit analysis and sizing. Assignments will be completed based on field trip observations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 14
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 25
    Engineering Design 15

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 201  and MINE 267  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 338 Deleted - Mine Ventilation |


    Hydraulics of air flow through mine openings and ducts is first studied, leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. The engineering design, testing, selection and application of mine ventilation fans are studied in detail. Topics related to the design of mine ventilation systems include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria, ventilation circuit design, natural ventilation, auxiliary ventilation design, psychometry, mine air heating and cooling, dust and fume control, and ventilation economics. Health hazards of mine gases, dust and radiation are reviewed, together with statutory requirements for air quality. Procedures for conducting air quantity, pressure and air quality surveys are also taught. - COURSE DELETED 2014-2015

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    MINE 339 Mine Ventilation F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Hydraulics of air flow through mine openings and ducts is first studied, leading to mine ventilation Hydraulics of air flow through mine openings and ducts is studied, leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. Topics related to the design of mine ventilation systems include: statutory regulations and engineering design criteria, ventilation circuit design, natural ventilation, testing, application and selection of mine ventilation fans, auxiliary ventilation design, psychrometry, mine air heating and cooling, dust and fume control, and ventilation economics. Health hazards of mine gases, dust and radiation are reviewed, together with statutory requirements for air quality. Procedures for conducting air quantity and quality surveys are also taught.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 14
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 40
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 225  and MECH 230  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 341 Open Pit Mining F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1.5
    This course presents technologies and techniques employed in open pit mining with a focus on strategic and operations planning considerations. Topics of study include: pit design, application of algorithms for economic pit limit analysis, equipment selection, production scheduling, material control and reconciliation, remote sensing and geomatics applications, mine waste management, emerging trends in open pit mining, and mine safety. Regulatory controls and best practices in design are stressed for all stages of the mine life cycle. Environmental impacts of design decisions and mitigating strategies are explored. The use of software at various stages of the design and planning process is introduced and a strategic design project completed using commercial software applications.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 14
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 24

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 221  and MINE 201 , or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 422 Mining and Sustainability F | 4


    Lecture: 4
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course describes the evolution of policies, operational procedures and management systems related to sustainability and the social, economic, environmental, ethical, and technical design challenges facing the mining industry. Themes examined will include: international and national performance expectations, standards and regulations; operational and management responses – social and environmental impact risk assessment; stakeholder engagement; impact mitigation planning and risk management systems; performance monitoring, evaluation and reporting; agreement making and benefit sharing. Students will be introduced to a range of complex situations with significant sustainability implications that need to be addressed responsibly during the life cycle of a mine, such as land acquisition, population and livelihood displacement, cultural heritage and habitat preservation, water use, waste disposal, mining-community relationships, mine closure and its community and environmental implications.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 24
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 12

  
  •  

    MINE 434 Project Report F/W | 4


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 3
    In this course, the student is exposed to research in the mining, mineral processing and metal extraction industries. The work is performed under the supervision of a Faculty member. Standing is based on the work done and on the ability of individuals to meet project deliverables according to the schedule provided. The deliverables include; research proposal, research plan and literature review, poster presentation, and final report in the form of a technical paper. The deliverables can be based on research performed during the fall and winter terms or an extension of a summer employment research project. Emphasis is placed on the critical treatment of the data obtained to produce useful conclusions. Participation in the departmental seminar series once per month is mandatory. Each student should submit a one page précis of the seminar.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 24
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 24

  
  •  

    MINE 445 Open Pit Mine Design W | 5.5


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 3
    Tutorial: 1.5
    The material of MINE 341  is applied to the design of an open pit mine. Special attention is given to the selection of equipment and the use of computers in strategic and detailed mine planning and scheduling. The course uses commercial mine planning software to enable small groups of students (2-4) to complete mine designs starting with topography maps, drill information, and mineral inventory block models. Several real deposit databases are used including gold, copper, copper/molybdenum, copper/zinc. The deposits are evaluated, feasibility assessed, and production decisions discussed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 20
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 46

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 330  and MINE 341 , and either MINE 326  or MINE 467 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 448 Underground Design W | 5.5


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 3
    This course provides an opportunity to apply a knowledge of basics to the design of an underground mine. Initial design information may range from diamond-drill assay data to a partially or completely designed mine. The problem of design or renovation entails ground stability, ventilation, systems analysis, equipment selection, maintenance, etc, with safety and economics as the basic criteria for design.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 18
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 48

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 221 , MINE 244 , MINE 339 , MINE 325 , MINE 467  AND MINE 469  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 451 Chemical Extraction of Metals F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The recovery and recycling of metals by both hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical techniques is discussed. The thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the solutions utilized in these processes are reviewed. The major unit operations of the hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical processes are studied. For hydrometallurgy, the unit operations are; ion exchange, solvent extraction, cementation, purification, precipitation, electrowinning and electrorefining. Particular emphasis will be placed on the recovery of gold. For pyrometallurgy the unit operations are; roasting, agglomeration, calcination, smelting, converting, refining and electrolysis. In the course, the importance of environmental stewardship in metal extraction is stressed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 10
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 10

  
  •  

    MINE 455 Design, Analysis and Operation of Mineral Processes F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1.5
    The material of MINE 341  is applied to the design of an open pit mine. Special attention is given to the selection of equipment and the use of computers in strategic and detailed mine planning and scheduling. The course uses commercial mine design software to enable small groups of students to complete mine designs starting with topographical maps, exploration drilling information, and mineral inventory block models. Several real deposit databases are used including gold, copper, copper/molybdenum, copper/zinc. The deposits are evaluated, feasibility assessed, and production decisions discussed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 54

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 330  and MINE 341 , and either MINE 326  or MINE 467 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 458 Process Investigations W | 4


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 3
    Tutorial: 0
    Projects may involve design of new processes, re-design of existing processes, process simulation and process innovation. Oral presentations and a formal report are required at the end of the term.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 48

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 455  or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 459 Reliability, Maintenance, and Risk Assessment W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1
    This course aims to impart the analytical foundations and engineering insights necessary for the reliability analysis, maintenance, and risk assessment of industrial plants and equipment. Case studies are used throughout the course. Topics addressed include: reliability and failure analysis (FMECA, HAZOP); maintenance planning policies and life cycle behaviour; organization of maintenance operations; maintenance management and information systems; condition-based maintenance (CBM); reliability centred maintenance (RCM) and RCMII; reliability growth management in design and test.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 36
    Engineering Design 12

  
  •  

    MINE 460 Special Topics in Mining Engineering F/W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    This course will change from year to year as subjects of special interest to mining engineers arise, or as special staff are available.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 27
    Engineering Design 27

  
  •  

    MINE 462 Occupational Health and Safety in Mining Practice F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Affirms a societal rationale and framework for due diligence in health, safety and environment (HS&E). Considers the five principal categories of workplace environmental factors that may lead to ill health / death, and introduces the principles (strategies and techniques) of exposure assessment (relative to both regulatory and professional standards) and control, as part of the Anticipation-Recognition-Evaluation-Communication-Control sequence. Enables the student to resolve, by means of memorandum, a specific topical occupational health issue. In addition to providing the basic tools for undertaking occupational health risk assessment / management, reviews fundamental chemical (non-toxicological) hazards and risk parameters.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of 3rd year Mining Engineering or permission of the instructor.
  
  •  

    MINE 467 Geostatistics and Orebody Modelling F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    This course introduces those principals of geostatistics used in evaluating grade distribution in orebodies from drillhole data. Basic concepts of spatial distributions, sampling, distance weighted averages, and variograms are covered. Cases from practice will be employed to illustrate concepts. Use of commercially available software to carry out geostatistical calculations and graphical representation will be made. Utilizing these techniques, students will develop a block model of ore grade distribution for an orebody and then apply this model to a mine pre-feasibility study in a subsequent course.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 16
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 24

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 326 , or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MINE 469 Stability Analysis in Mine Design F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Application of rock mechanics principles to mine design. Includes planning and execution of geotechnical investigation programs, empirical and analytical methods of stability analysis and support design. Numerical methods are introduced, with emphasis on how to choose among them for particular applications and how to evaluate results. Instrumentation programs are described. Methods are illustrated using case histories.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 12
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 24

    PREREQUISITE(S): MINE 325  or equivalent
  
  •  

    MINE 471 Mine-Mechanical Design Project W | 5.5


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 3
    This course involves a design project with emphasis on the mechanical aspects of mine or plant design and operation. Typical topics include mobile equipment, materials handling, automation, equipment redesign and systems integration.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 18
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 48

    PREREQUISITE(S): Completion of all 2nd and 3rd year courses or permission of instructor.
  
  •  

    MINE 472 Mining Systems, Automation, and Robotics O/L | K3.5


    In order to address issues related to safety, productivity, and remote operations, the world’s mineral resources industry has been gradually shifting towards the increased use of automated systems and roboticallyenhanced machines. It is important, therefore, that graduate engineers understand how these new technologies work so as to improve and make best use of them. This online course introduces senior students to the fundamental tools and techniques of automation and robotics as applied to modern mining practice. Enrolment is open to students from a range of engineering disciplines. This course provides an introduction to the basics of systems control, examples of how methods of automatic control can be applied to mining equipment and associated industrial vehicles, as well as to the fundamentals of sensing and navigation as applied to the design of robotic mobile equipment. Available Online.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): MECH 350  or MTHE 332  or ELEC 443  or permission of the instructor

Mining Technology

  
  •  

    MNTC P01 Engineering Mathematics W/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course provides a detailed introduction to the fundamentals of calculus and linear algebra as applied to engineering applications. The purpose of the course is to provide a mathematical foundation for students pursuing upper-year engineering-related courses. The course covers topics such as derivatives, implicit differentiation, partial derivatives, integrals, first-order and higher-order linear ordinary differential equations, fundamentals of Laplace transforms, matrices and matrix inverses, solving systems of linear equations, vector spaces, orthogonality, and determinants. Topics are introduced by way of engineering examples. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC P02 Mining Geology W/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The geology of the Precambrian, Paleozoic, and Cenozoic eras is introduced in this course. Students are introduced to mapping technologies and the ‘art’ of visualization. Topics include basic geological structures, historical geology, and physical processes such as glaciation. Mineralogy is introduced through the physical properties of minerals. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC P03 Foundational Mathematics F/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course investigates the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. It develops techniques for combining functions and broadens understanding of rates of change while exploring how functions model real-world contexts. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC P04 Calculus W/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Functions, limits, derivatives; optimization, rate problems, exponentials, logarithms, inverse trigonometric functions; exponential growth as an example of a differential equation. Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Riemann integral; applications to problems involving areas, volumes, mass, charge, work, etc. Some integration techniques. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC P05 Foundational Physics W/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course introduces new engineering students to Newtonian mechanics, including the concepts of work, energy, and momentum. A focus is given to problems that provide foundations for future technical courses in engineering. Finally, an introduction to simple electric circuits is given, and concepts such as voltage, current, and resistance are studied. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC P06 Foundational Chemistry F/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the structure and properties of matter, energy changes and rates of reaction, basic organic chemistry, equilibrium in chemical systems, and electrochemistry. Students will further develop their problem-solving and investigation skills as they investigate chemical processes, and this course will refine their ability to communicate scientific information. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 301 Technical Writing and Communication F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course focuses on the principles and practical applications of academic writing. Students apply effective writing strategies to address a variety of academic audiences. Students plan, outline, write, and revise reader-centered documents and print and electronic texts that relate to forms and contexts they will encounter in academia Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 302 Engineering Physics F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course further develops physical concepts of mechanics and electromagnetism in the context of engineering applications. The first part of the course focuses on the mechanics of solid materials, building upon knowledge of rigid-body mechanics and introducing students to the concepts of material strength and elastic deformation. These concepts will be applied to structural members such as rods, columns, shafts, and beams, with loading conditions such as tension, compression, bending, and torsion. The second part of the course focuses on basic direct-current (DC) electrical circuitry and components including electric motors. Students will study concepts such as voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Simple circuit analysis using Kirchoff’s laws will be presented, and the sizing and integration of electric motors both electrically and mechanically will be introduced. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 303 Engineering Chemistry F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The focus of this course is to survey chemical processes and demonstrate its relationship to current practices in mining technology. Students will examine chemical reactions in terms of mass relationships, chemical equations, chemical equilibrium and acid/base reactions concerning aqueous solutions. The examination of the laws of thermodynamics and the behaviour of gases will be explored to provide the necessary background for calculations applied to ideal and non-ideal vapours and liquids. Principles of chemical kinetics and electrochemical reactions will also be studied. Students will have an opportunity to expand their knowledge of organic chemistry to include properties and reactions of functional groups, naming and recognizing key organic structures and apply this knowledge to hydrometallurgy. Special emphasis will be placed upon chemical extraction methods, instrumental analysis, data manipulation and interpretation of key analytes of interest to the mining industry. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 304 Applied Metrology and Data Analysis W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The objective of this course is to offer students an introduction to some of the primary tools and techniques of contemporary instrumentation and analysis. Presented is an introduction to signal analysis, data acquisition, sampling and quantization, as well as the fundamental statistical techniques necessary to process and analyze measured data with uncertainty. The course focuses on applied methods and draws on several examples that demonstrate the use of sensors and data acquisition in mining Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 305 Introduction to Mining F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents an overview of the stages of mining, from exploration and prospecting, through development, extraction, and finally closure and reclamation.  Students are introduced to mine financing, methods and design (both surface and underground), mining operations and planning, services (e.g., rock mechanics, ventilation, drilling and blasting), mineral processing, mining equipment and technologies, as well as social and environmental challenges.  Case studies and examples are used to illustrate the fundamentals. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 306 Mineral Processing Unit Operations W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course focuses on unit operations of mineral processing. Mineral separation processes of a physical and physicochemical nature are studied. Topics include size reduction, classification, flotation, flocculation, gravity concentration, magnetic, electrostatic separations and dewatering. Surface phenomena involving fine particle processing, reagent classifications, flotation machines and circuits, plant practice in ore flotation are discussed. The field school component of MNTC 399  will cover selected topics such as crushing, grinding, particle size analysis, gravity separation, magnetic separation, differential flotation. Quantitative understanding of various topics is facilitated through problem solving in class and assignments on mass balancing, kinetic analysis and circuit sizing. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 307 Geomechanics and Ground Control W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The study of rock mechanics is essentially the study of the action of forces on rock masses. The important conditions which are associated with stressed rock involve the formation of fracture phenomena (and related stability assessment) caused by stress, strain and energy transformations resulting from the application of changing or variable networks of forces within rock masses. Elastic prototypes are developed to investigate stress conditions around mine openings. Failure theories are discussed and used to explain fracture patterns. Stereographic methods of three - dimensional analysis are introduced. The presence of fault and joint development in large rock masses dictates the use of broader engineering methods than those based entirely on idealized conditions. Techniques based on empirical knowledge and supported by available theory are presented, including slope stability, open pit design, tunnels, underground structural design, rock foundations, ground water, rock bursts and bumps, and design hazards. Various types of instrumentation of interest for rock characterization and monitoring are also discussed Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 308 Safety and Occupational Health W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course is designed to help develop skills and knowledge about industrial occupational health and safety practices, in general, and to relate their applications to the mining industry in particular. The course will affirm a societal rationale and framework for the implementation of due diligence in health, safety and environmental control. The course will consider the five principal categories of workplace environmental factors that may lead to ill health/death, and introduces the strategies and techniques of exposure assessment, relative to both regulatory and professional standards, and control as part of the Anticipation -Recognition -Evaluation -Communication -Control sequence. In addition to providing the basic tools for undertaking occupational health risk assessment/management, the course will review fundamental industrial, chemical, (non - toxicological) hazards and risks and provide the basic tools for undertaking occupational health risk assessment and management. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 309 Engineering Economics F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Business practices play a major role in shaping the context for engineering projects. The aim of the course, through readings, lectures, individual assignments and quizzes is to provide insight into the business and economic aspects of engineering by examining the issues relating to the management of people, time & money and provide the tools required to solve basic economic questions faced by an engineer. Factors underlying the success and failure of projects will be highlighted. Business Planning, Project Management and Engineering Economics are closely related, but vast subjects. The scope of this course will be limited to the topics covered in the textbook “Engineering Economics, Second Custom Edition for Queen’s University”, along with supplemental material provided on the class website. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 310 Mining and Society W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course takes a look at the social, economic, environmental, ethical, and technical issues facing the mining industry. An introduction to the mining industry’s relation to society will explore the changing context of the mining industry and its evolving practice, identify various socio -environmental issues, and describe how governments attempt to regulate the industry. A brief assessment of the concept of corporate social responsibility will assess society need for proper industrial stewardship, and identify key roles mining corporations play within their communities. Finally, the course will go into the details of land acquisition, including a review of various cultural issues, and identification of major stakeholders involved in the process. Students will discuss the practical challenges related to a company’s social license to operate Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    COREQUISITE(S): MNTC 301  
  
  •  

    MNTC 311 Ore Body Modelling and Resource Estimation F/W/S | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents a basic introduction to the use of classical and geostatistical estimation techniques for mineral resource estimation. Students will learn to recognize the geological influences to ore body modelling, apply various estimation methods, produce mineralization reports, and classify the mineral resources and reserves according to accepted internationally recognized methods. The course will also include basic ore exploration and sampling concepts. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 312 Business Law and Ethics W/S | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course is intended to provide the student with a solid general knowledge of Business Law and Ethics. The course will cover core areas of the law, including the nature and structure of the Canadian justice system, contract, intellectual property, and tort law, as well as introduce concepts such as professional liability and ethics and the professions. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 301  
  
  •  

    MNTC 399 Field School I (Kingston) S/OL | 3.5


    Lecture: 3.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Field School I provides a hands -on laboratory experience for fields related to the third year curriculum. Field school modules include an introduction to laboratory techniques and data analysis, rock mechanics, blasting technology, and mineral processing. Students will develop practical skills both in laboratory and realistic field scenarios. A focus on occupational health and safety is emphasized throughout. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 301 , MNTC 302 , MNTC 303 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 306 , MNTC 307 ,MNTC 308  
  
  •  

    MNTC 413 Surface Mine Design W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents a comprehensive overview of the principal components of surface mine design. Topics include pit limit analysis and economic optimization, haul road design, blast design, and basic stability calculations. Equipment selection and application and mine scheduling techniques will be introduced, including dragline applications. The focus will be on the practical application of design techniques to mine planning, and on the available equipment and methods for field monitoring to provide effective design feedback and support safe operations Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 305 , MNTC 308 , MNTC 309 , MNTC 310 , MNTC 311  
  
  •  

    MNTC 414 Underground Mine Design S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    A study of underground mining technology will be presented. Up -to -date mining methods are reviewed, and trends in mining method development are closely analyzed. Mine design is studied in relation to ore reserves, tonnage and grade distribution. The problems and possibilities of existing and evolving mining techniques are reviewed. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 305 , MNTC 307 , MNTC 308 , MNTC 311  
  
  •  

    MNTC 415 Metallurgical Techniques S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course covers the fundamentals and practical applications of major hydrometallurgical and pyrometallurgical unit operations. An introduction to physical, hydrometallurgical and thermochemical processing in the production of metals and materials will be provided. Basic processing concepts and unit operations will be discussed. Fundamentals of mass and heat balances in metallurgical processes will be covered. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 303 , MNTC 306  
  
  •  

    MNTC 416 Mine Services I: Ventilation and Hydraulics F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Hydraulics of air flow through mine airways and ducts is studied, leading to mine ventilation design calculations and ventilation network analysis. Topics related to the design of mine ventilation systems include regulations and design criteria. Procedures for conducting air quantity and quality surveys are taught. The basics of hydraulic systems and fluid mechanics are introduced. Topics covered include fluid statics, the energy balance, the momentum balance, pumps, and mine drainage and dewatering systems. Practical applications to the mining industry will be explored. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 303 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 417 Mine Services II: Power, Communications and Compressed Air F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents a practical introduction to auxiliary mine services, including mine electrical power, communications systems, and compressed air services. Students are expected to evaluate the mine service requirements, make appropriate equipment selections, and estimate the costs associated with installation and operation of mine services. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 418 Mining Sustainability and the Environment S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course describes the evolution of policies, operational procedures, and management systems related to sustainability and the social, economic, environmental, ethical, and technical design challenges facing the mining industry. Students will be introduced to a range of complex situations with significant sustainability implications that need to be addressed responsibly during the life cycle of a mine, such as resource, water, and waste management, mining -community relationships, mine closure and rehabilitation, as well as a mine closure’s community and environmental implications. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 305 , MNTC 310  
  
  •  

    MNTC 419 Mine Supervision and Project Management S | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents an introduction to mine supervision; covering the roles and responsibilities of the industrial supervisor including health and safety; technical skills and knowledge and effective communications with different stakeholder levels from front line workers to senior management. The second part of the course will introduce key concepts related to project management including the role of the project manager, identifying requirements and balancing of competing project constraints which include, but are not limited to, scope, schedule, cost, quality, and risk. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 301 , MNTC 305 , MNTC 308 , MNTC 309  
  
  •  

    MNTC 420 Mine Mechanization and Maintenance S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents an introduction to the topic of mechanization in the minerals industry. It includes a comprehensive review of the evolution of mechanized equipment in mining, as well as existing and emerging mechanical excavation technologies (e.g., automation and robotics). Major topics include the theory and principles of mechanical fragmentation and cutting, and appropriate equipment selection to meet production requirements. This course also provides and introduction to reliability modelling and analysis (e.g., failure mode analysis and life distribution models), and discusses the selection of appropriate equipment maintenance strategies (e.g., run -to -failure, scheduled, and condition -based maintenance). Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 421 Organizational Behaviour and Human Resources F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The foundation for the effective management of companies in the mining sector lies in understanding the management of its most fundamental resource: its people. Sound knowledge of human behaviour informs many elements including employee recruitment, evaluation, compensation and organizational culture. These play critical roles in a company’s success. Knowing the role of the Human Resources department, and the different tools and methods used to approach issues will give learners insight into the soft skills required to be effective managers Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

  
  •  

    MNTC 422 Soft Rock Mining and Processing F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course describes the industrial mining practices associated with a number of industrial minerals. A major emphasis of the course on quarry mining operations related to the major mineral and aggregate industries will be explored. Topics will cover resource definition, quarry planning and design, extraction, and processing of materials. Details for each topic include marketing, transportation, source geology, typical operations, mining, processing, customers, and specifications. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 305 , MNTC 306 , MNTC 307  
  
  •  

    MNTC 423 Geomatics F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of mine surveying. Basic measurement and calculation techniques are used to measure distances, elevation changes, and coordinates. The principles of measurement theory, as well as error propagation and analysis are taught, to give students the knowledge required to complete the field school laboratories. Finally, a study of modern survey technology such as total stations, LiDar, and GPS mapping will give students an understanding of the latest technologies being used in industry today. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 302 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 305  
  
  •  

    MNTC 424 Capstone Project F/W/S/OL | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    The objective of this course is to further develop the student’s design, innovation, and professional skills. Working in teams, students will engage in a mining-related real-world design project. Design processes will be applied from problem definition, scheduling, though to exception and validation. Professional engineering skills such as communication, teamwork, project management techniques, engineering economics, ethics, and safety will be integral to the project. The course will culminate in the production of an engineering design report and video presentation of the design. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 413 , MNTC 414 , MNTC 415  
  
  •  

    MNTC 499 Field School II (Timmins) S/OL | 3.5


    Lecture: 3.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Field School II covers the laboratory component for all fourth year curriculum. Modules will include a study of geology and rocks, mine ventilation, an introduction to metallurgical techniques, as well as surveying technologies. Students will develop basic laboratory analytical skills both in lab and field sessions. A focus on safety and occupational health will be maintained throughout. Available Online. Must be enrolled in the BTECH program.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics n/a
    Natural Sciences n/a
    Complementary Studies n/a
    Engineering Science n/a
    Engineering Design n/a

    PREREQUISITE(S): MNTC 301 , MNTC 302 , MNTC 303 , MNTC 304 , MNTC 415 , MNTC 416 , MNTC 423  

Mathematics and Engineering

  
  •  

    MTHE 212 Linear Algebra W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Vector spaces, direct sums, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, inner product spaces, self-adjoint operators, positive operators, singular-value decomposition, minimal polynomials, Jordan canonical form, the projection theorem, applications to approximation and optimization problems.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 174  
    EXCLUSION(S): MTHE 312  (MATH 312)

  
  •  

    MTHE 217 Algebraic Structures with Applications F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The purpose of the course is to provide an introduction to abstract algebraic systems and to illustrate the concepts with engineering applications. Topics include symbolic logic; switching and logic circuits; set theory, equivalence relations and mappings; the integers and modular arithmetic; groups, cyclic groups, Lagrange’s theorem, group quotients, group homomorphisms and isomorphisms; applications to error-control codes for noisy communication channels.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 30
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 174 
  
  •  

    MTHE 224 Applied Mathematics for Civil Engineers F | 4.2


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.4
    Tutorial: 0.8
    The course will discuss the application of linear differential equations with constant coefficients, and systems of linear equations within the realm of civil engineering. Additionally, the course will explore relevant data analysis techniques including: graphical and statistical analysis and presentation of experimental data, random sampling, estimation using confidence intervals, linear regression, residuals and correlation.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 50
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 142 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
    EXCLUSION(S): MTHE 225  (MATH 225), MATH 226, MTHE 235  (MATH 235), MTHE 237  (MATH 237), STAT 267, MTHE 367  (STAT 367)

  
  •  

    MTHE 225 Ordinary Differential Equations F/W/S | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    First order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients, and applications, Laplace transforms, systems of linear equations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174  
  
  •  

    MTHE 227 Vector Analysis F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Review of multiple integrals. Differentiation and integration of vectors; line, surface and volume integrals; gradient, divergence and curl; conservative fields and potential. Spherical and cylindrical coordinates, solid angle. Green’s and Stokes’ theorems, the divergence theorem.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 36
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
  
  •  

    MTHE 228 Complex Analysis W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Complex arithmetic, complex plane. Differentiation, analytic functions. Elementary functions. Elementary functions. Contour integration, Cauchy’s Theorem and Integral Formula. Taylor and Laurent series, residues with applications to evaluation of integrals.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
  
  •  

    MTHE 232 Deleted - Differential Equations |


    Introduction to ordinary differential equations and their applications to the physical and social sciences. Topics may include: numerical solutions, power series and series solutions, Laplace transforms. - COURSE DELETED 2015-2016

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 36
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
    EXCLUSION(S): MTHE 225  (MATH 225), MATH 226, MATH 231, MTHE 235  (MATH 235), MTHE 237  (MATH 237)

  
  •  

    MTHE 235 Differential Equations for Electrical and Computer Engineers F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    First order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant coefficients. Laplace transforms. Systems of linear differential equations. Introduction to numerical methods for ODEs. Examples involving the use of differential equations in solving circuits will be presented.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 27
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
  
  •  

    MTHE 237 Differential Equations for Engineering Science F | 3.25


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.25
    Topics include models for dynamical systems, classification of differential equations, methods for solving differential equations, systems of equations and connections with Linear Algebra, stability of dynamical systems and Lyapunov’s method, the Laplace Transform method, and numerical and computer methods.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 10
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 , APSC 174 
    EXCLUSION(S): MATH 231, MTHE 232  (MATH 232)

  
  •  

    MTHE 272 Application of Numerical Methods W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0
    An introductory course on the effective use of computers in science and engineering. Topics include: solving linear and nonlinear equations, interpolation, integration, and numerical solution of ordinary differential equations. Extensive use is made of MATLAB, a high level interactive numerical package.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 20
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 174  or equivalent (Note: some programming experience is important for the course)
    COREQUISITE(S): MTHE 225  or MTHE 235  or MTHE 232  or equivalent
  
  •  

    MTHE 280 Advanced Calculus F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Limits, Continuity, C’, and linear approximations of functions of several variables. Multiple integrals and Jacobians, Line and surface integrals. The theorems of Green, Stokes, and Gauss.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 172 , APSC 174 
    EXCLUSION(S): MATH 221, MTHE 227  (MATH 227)

  
  •  

    MTHE 281 Introduction to Real Analysis W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Taylor’s theorem, optimization, implicit and inverse function theorems. Elementary topology of Euclidean spaces. Sequences and series of numbers and functions. Pointwise and uniform convergence. Power series.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 172 
  
  •  

    MTHE 312 Deleted - Linear Algebra |


    Vector spaces, linear transformations and matrices. Linear equations. Determinants. Eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Normal forms. Linear functions and dual spaces. Bilinear functions, quadratic and hermitian forms. Inner product spaces, the projection theorem and applications to approximation and optimization problems. - COURSE DELETED 2015-2016

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 217  (MATH 217) or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 326 Functions of a Complex Variable F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Complex numbers, analytic functions, harmonic functions. Cauchy’s theorem. Taylor and Laurent series. Calculus of residues. Rouche’s theorem.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 36
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 280  (MATH 280), MTHE 281  (MATH 281)
  
  •  

    MTHE 332 Introduction to Control W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Modeling control systems, linearization around an equilibrium point. Block diagrams, impulse response, transfer function, frequency response. Controllability and observability, LTI realizations. Feedback and stability, Lyapunov stability criterion, pole placement, Routh criterion. Input/output stability, design of PID controllers, Bode plots, Nyquist plots, Nyquist stability criterion, robust controllers.Laboratory experiments illustrate the control concepts learned in class.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 15
    Natural Sciences 5
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 23
    Engineering Design 5

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 326  (MATH 326)
    COREQUISITE(S): MTHE 335  
  
  •  

    MTHE 333 Deleted - Control-Robotics Lab I |


    This laboratory introduces the use of motion control devices such as optical encoders, pulse width amplifiers and armature controlled DC servo motors. The experiments complement the analytical and theoretical work on control taken in other third year courses. Students design and implement proportional, proportional-derivative, and proportional-integral-derivative controllers. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 4
    Engineering Design 8

    COREQUISITE(S): MTHE 332 
  
  •  

    MTHE 334 Mathematical Methods for Engineering and Physics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Banach and Hilbert spaces of continuous- and discrete-time signals; spaces of continuous and not necessarily continuous signals; continuous-discrete Fourier transform; continuous-continuous Fourier transform; discrete-continuous Fourier transform; discrete-discrete Fourier transform; transform inversion using Fourier series and Fourier integrals.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 28
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 212  (MATH 212), MTHE 281  (MATH 281)
  
  •  

    MTHE 335 Mathematics of Engineering Systems W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Linear input/output systems and their stability. Frequency-domain and time-domain analysis. Continuous and discrete-time modeling. Fourier, Laplace, and Z-transforms. Sampling and the discrete-time Fourier transform. Applications to modulation of communications signals, filter design, and digital sampling.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 15
    Natural Sciences 6
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 10
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 334  (MATH 334), MTHE 326  (MATH 326) or MTHE 228  (MATH 228)
  
  •  

    MTHE 337 Introduction to Operations Research Models W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Some probability distributions, simulation, Markov chains, queuing theory, dynamic programming, inventory theory.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 9

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 174  , MTHE 367   and permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 338 Fourier Methods for Boundary Value Problems F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Methods and theory for ordinary and partial differential equations; separation of variables in rectangular and cylindrical coordinate systems; sinusoidal and Bessel orthogonal functions; the wave, diffusion, and Laplace’s equation; Sturm-Liouville theory; Fourier transform and Laplace transform techniques.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 28
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 227  (MATH 227) or MTHE 280  (MATH 280), MATH 226 or MTHE 237  (MATH 237) or MTHE 232  (MATH 232) or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 339 Evolutionary Game Theory W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course highlights the usefulness of game theoretical approaches in solving problems in the natural sciences and economics. Basic ideas of game theory, including Nash equilibrium and mixed strategies; stability using approaches developed for the study of dynamical systems, including evolutionary stability and replicator dynamics; the emergence of co-operative behaviour; limitations of applying the theory to human behaviour.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 9
    Complementary Studies 9
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 172  or MATH 120 (or MATH 121); APSC 174  or MATH 110 (or MATH 111) recommended
    EXCLUSION(S): MATH 239

  
  •  

    MTHE 351 Probability I F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course is a PREREQUISITE for theoretical statistics courses and further courses in probability and stochastic processes. Basic probability theory: probability models; discrete and continuous random variables; moments; jointly distributed random variables; transformations and generating functions. Inequalities and limit laws. Distributions include: binomial, Poisson, exponential, gamma, normal. Applications include: elementary stochastic processes, time-to-failure models, binary communication channels with Gaussian noise.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    COREQUISITE(S): MTHE 280 
    EXCLUSION(S): STAT 251

  
  •  

    MTHE 353 Probability II W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Intermediate probability theory as a basis for further study in mathematical statistics and stochastic processes; probability measures, expectations; modes of convergence of sequences of random variables; conditional expectations; independent systems of random variables; Gaussian systems; characteristic functions; Law of large numbers, Central limit theory; some notions of dependence.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 36
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): STAT 251 or MTHE 351  (STAT 351), APSC 174 , MTHE 281  (MATH 281)
  
  •  

    MTHE 367 Engineering Data Analysis W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Exploratory data analysis – graphical and statistical analysis and presentation of experimental data. Random sampling. Probability and probability models for discrete and continuous random variables. Process capability. Normal probability graphs. Sampling distribution of means and proportions. Statistical Quality Control and Statistical Process Control. Estimation using confidence intervals. Testing of hypothesis procedures for means, variances and proportions – one and two samples cases. Liner regression, residuals and correlation. ANOVA. Use of statistical software.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 31
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 
    EXCLUSION(S): STAT 261, STAT 263, STAT 266, STAT 267

  
  •  

    MTHE 393 Engineering Design and Practice for Mathematics and Engineering W | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This is a project-based design course where methods of applied mathematics are used to solve a complex open-ended engineering problem. The projects involve using system theoretic methods for modeling, analysis, and design applied to engineering problems arising in a variety of engineering disciplines. Students will work in teams and employ design processes to arrive at a solution. The course will include elements of communications, economic analysis, impacts of engineering, professionalism, and engineering ethics.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200 
    COREQUISITE(S): MTHE 332 , MTHE 335 
  
  •  

    MTHE 406 Introduction to Coding Theory F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Construction and properties of finite fields. Polynomials, vector spaces, block codes over finite fields. Hamming distance and other code parameters. Bounds relating code parameters. Cyclic codes and their structure as ideals. Weight distribution. Special codes and their relation to designs and projective planes. Decoding algorithms.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 14
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 10

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 217  (MATH 217)
  
  •  

    MTHE 418 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Number Theory and Cryptography F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Time estimates for arithmetic and elementary number theory algorithms (division algorithm, Euclidean algorithm, congruences), modular arithmetic, finite fields, quadratic residues. Simple cryptographic systems; public key, RSA. Primality and factoring: pseudoprimes, Pollard’s rho-method, index calculus. Elliptic curve cryptography.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 9

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 217  (MATH 217) or MATH 210 or MATH 211 with permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 430 Modern Control Theory F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course covers core topics in modern control theory: Linearization, existence and uniqueness of trajectories for nonlinear and linear systems, the transition matrix, controllability, observabiity, minimal realizations, feedback stabilization, linear state observers, optimal control theory, the linear quadratic regulator, dynamic programming.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 6
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 6

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 237  (MATH 237), MTHE 212  (MATH 212) or MTHE 312  (MATH 312), MTHE 326  (MATH 326),MTHE 332  (MATH 332), or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 434 Optimization Theory and Applications F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Theory of convex sets and functions; separation theorems; primal-dual properties; geometric treatment of optimization problems; algorithmic procedures for solving constrained optimization programs; engineering and economic applications.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 15
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 15
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 280  (MATH 280), MTHE 281  (MATH 281), MTHE 212  (MATH 212) or MTHE 312  (MATH 312), or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 437 Deleted - Topics in Applied Mathematics | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Subject matter to vary from year to year. - COURSE DELETED 2013-2014

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 9
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 439 Lagrangian Mechanics, Dynamics, and Control W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Geometric modelling, including configuration space, tangent bundle, kinetic energy, inertia, and force. Euler-Lagrange equations using affine connections. The last part of the course develops one of the following three applications: mechanical systems with nonholonomic constraints; control theory for mechanical systems; equilibria and stability.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 20
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 11

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 280  (MATH 280), MTHE 281  (MATH 281), MTHE 237  (MATH 237) or MATH 231, or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 454 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Statistical Spectrum Estimation W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Many systems evolve with an inherent amount of randomness in time and/or space. The focus of this course is on developing and analyzing methods for analyzing time series. Because most of the common time–domain methods are unreliable, the emphasis is on frequency–domain methods, i.e. methods that work and expose the bias that plagues most time–domain techniques. Slepian sequences (discrete prolate spheroidal sequences) and multi–taper methods of spectrum estimation are covered in detail.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 12
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 353  (STAT 353), MTHE 312  (MATH 312); or MTHE 338  (MATH 338), STAT 251; or STAT 261, MATH 321; or permission or the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 455 Stochastic Processes and Applications F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Markov chains, birth and death processes, random walk problems, elementary renewal theory, Markov processes, Brownian motion and Poisson processes, queuing theory, branching processes.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 28
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 14
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 353  (STAT 353) or one of STAT 251, MTHE 351  (STAT 351), ELEC 326  with permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 472 Control of Stochastic Systems W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Optimal control of stochastic systems with applications to engineering systems and applied mathematics. Topics include Markov chains and stochastic stability, Martingales, dynamic programming, fully observed and partially observed models, non-linear filtering, Kalman Filtering, linear programming approach, team decision and information structures.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 9
    Engineering Design 9

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 351  (STAT 351), MTHE 332  (MATH 332), or permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 474 Information Theory F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Topics include: information measures, entropy, mutual information, modeling of information sources, lossless data compression, block encoding, variable-length encoding, Kraft inequality, fundamentals of channel coding, channel capacity, rate-distortion theory, lossy data compression, rate-distortion theorem.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 9
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 17
    Engineering Design 10

    PREREQUISITE(S): STAT 251 or MTHE 351  (STAT 351) or ELEC 326  
  
  •  

    MTHE 477 Data Compression and Source Coding W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Topics include: arithmetic coding, universal lossless coding, Lempel-Ziv and related dictionary based methods, rate-distortion theory, scalar and vector quantization, predictive and transform coding, applications to speech and image coding.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 21
    Engineering Design 15

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 474  (MATH 474)
  
  •  

    MTHE 478 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Topics in Communication Theory F/W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Subject matter will vary from year to year. Possible subjects include: constrained coding and applications to magnetic and optical recording; data compression; theory and practice of error-control coding; design and performance analysis of communication networks; and other related topics.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    MTHE 484 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Data Networks W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course covers performance models for data networking, delay models and loss models; analysis of multiple access systems, routing, and flow control; multiplexing; priority systems; satellite multiple access, wireless networking, wireless sensor networks. Knowledge of networking protocols is not required.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 10
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 26
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 455  (STAT 455) or permission of the instructor
 

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