Aug 03, 2020  
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED 
    
2016-2017 Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science Calendar-ARCHIVED [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses of Instruction


 

Applied Science

  
  •  

    APSC 100 Engineering Practice l S | K11


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course introduces fundamental professional engineering skills and provides an opportunity to apply engineering science and mathematics content in situations emulating professional practice. It consists of three modules: Module 1. Problem analysis and modeling; Module 2. Experimentation and measurement; Module 3: Engineering design. The course provides an introduction to personal learning styles, team dynamics, oral and written presentation skills, laboratory data collection, analysis and presentation, project management, information management, problem analysis and modeling, numeric computation, economics, design methodologies, and workplace safety.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 6
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 40
    Engineering Science 40
    Engineering Design 30

  
  •  

    APSC 101 Engineering Problem Solving and Modeling F | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course provides an opportunity for students to develop complex problem solving and critical thinking skills and to apply engineering science knowledge in modeling physical systems through computational software. Examples and project topics are chosen to complement instruction in engineering science and mathematics courses. Ethical, economic, and social factors are considered in engineering problem solving. NOTE: This course covers the content and objectives of APSC 100  Module 1, and is available by permission only. (6/0/12/18/12)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 6
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor or Associate Dean (Academic)
    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 100  

  
  •  

    APSC 102 Experimentation and Design F/W | K3


    Lecture: No
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course introduces concepts of planning and designing experiments determine or measure particular system characteristics. The course content includes error analysis, data analysis and representation in Excel, and the design of experimental investigation for simple systems. NOTE: This course covers the content and objectives of APSC 100  Module 2, and is available by permission only.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 16
    Complementary Studies 4
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor or Associate Dean (Academic)
    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 100  

  
  •  

    APSC 103 Engineering Design Project W | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    This is a client-based team design project which develops skills including design, project management, technical communications, and professionalism. Students work in teams to define problems, gather and identify appropriate information, work effectively with teammates, generate ideas, select ideas, and implement a solution to a presented problems from a client. NOTE: This course covers the content and objectives of APSC 100  Module 3, and is available by permission only. (0/0/24/6/18)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 24
    Engineering Science 6
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor or Associate Dean (Academic)
    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 100  

  
  •  

    APSC 111 Mechanics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course is an introduction to Newtonian mechanics in the context of engineering applications. Lecture topics are: vectors, motion of a particle, particle dynamics, work and energy, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, conservation of energy, momentum, and collisions.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 42
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 112 Electricity and Magnetism W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course continues from APSC 111  to introduce electricity and further develop fundamental ideas of mechanics in the context of engineering applications. Lecture topics include: oscillations and waves, electric charge, electrical current and resistance, EMF, D.C. circuits and electrical measurements, electric field and potential, magnetic fields and their origin, and electromagnetic induction.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 31
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111  and APSC 171 
  
  •  

    APSC 131 Chemistry and Materials F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides an introduction to the chemistry of materials: thermochemistry, heat, work, internal energy, enthalpy and the first law of thermodynamics; gas laws in ideal and non-ideal systems; phase equilibria in one component systems; concepts of bonding in the classification of materials; the physical, electrical and mechanical properties of metals, polymers, semiconductors and ceramics; techniques of characterizing materials.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 31
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 132 Chemistry and its Applications W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course combines fundamentals of chemistry with the engineering issues associated with them. Areas of study are entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and organic chemistry. Environmental issues associated with each of these topics will be incorporated into lectures when appropriate.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 31
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 11
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 131 
  
  •  

    APSC 142 Introduction to Computer Programming for Engineers F/W | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    This course introduces concepts, theory and practice of computer programming. Implementation uses microcomputers. The emphasis is on the design of correct and efficient algorithms and on programming style. Applications are made to engineering problems. NOTE: The fall term delivery of this course is intended for students in the ECE direct-entry program, and enrolment in this term will require permission of the Associate Dean (Academic).

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 12

  
  •  

    APSC 151 Earth Systems and Engineering F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    This course provides an introduction to the complex Earth System (which encompasses the solid earth, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere), and our interactions with it. Using the Earth System as a framework, and coupled with the over-arching theme of sustainability, key concepts/issues relevant to engineers are dealt with, including: population demographics and resource usage; geopolitics; modeling of “fuzzy” systems; risk assessment and risk management; local- and global-scale impacts of engineering works on the government; short- and long-term natural and anthropogenic changes (including global warming); moral and ethical considerations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 24
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 161 Engineering Graphics F | 3.5


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    The principal objectives of the course are (1) to develop the student’s ability to visualize and communicate three-dimensional shapes and (2) to acquire the skills needed to use computer-aided design software. Topics covered are orthographic projection, isometric sketching, auxiliary and section views as well as dimensioning and working drawings. Computer-aided design software is used to create solid models of the parts and assemblies as well as to generate dimensioned drawings. Students apply their learning in a project where they design their own version of a consumer product. Students learn by hands-on exercises in free-hand sketching and computer-based drawing.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 37
    Engineering Design 5

  
  •  

    APSC 171 Calculus I F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Functions, limits, derivatives; optimization, rate problems, exponentials, logarithms, inverse trigonometric functions; exponential growth as an example of a differential equation. Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, Riemann integral; applications to problems involving areas, volumes, mass, charge, work, etc. Some integration techniques.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 172 Calculus II W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course continues calculus concepts from APSC 171 , including space curves, speed, and velocity. Functions of several variables, partial derivatives, differentials, error estimates, gradient, maxima and minima. Double and triple integrals, polar and cylindrical coordinates; applications to mass, center of mass, moment. Series, power series; Taylor polynomial approximations, error analysis.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171  
  
  •  

    APSC 174 Introduction to Linear Algebra W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Systems of linear equations; real vectors spaces and subspaces; linear combinations and linear spans; linear dependence and linear independence; applications to systems of linear equations and their solution via Gaussian elimination; bases and dimension of real vector spaces; linear transformations, range, kernel and Rank-Nullity theorem; matrix representation of a linear transformation; composition of linear transformations and matrix multiplication; invertible matrices and determinants; eigenvalues and eigenvectors of square matrices. Applications of the course material to engineering systems are illustrated.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 42
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 191 Deleted - Professional Engineering Skills FW | 3.5


    Lecture: 1.25
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 2.25
    This course is identical in content to APSC 190. The material normally delivered in APSC 190 in the first week of the winter term will be covered in evening sessions in the fall term in APSC 191. COURSE DELETED 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    APSC 200 Engineering Design and Practice II F/W | K4


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    In this course students will participate constructively on teams to create solutions to open-ended complex problems, using standard design methods and tools. This project-based course provides instruction primarily in the first 6 weeks of the semester focusing on problem scoping, creativity and idea generation, decision making incorporating technical, economic, societal, and environmental factors, safety, engineering codes and regulations, and engineering ethics. The final 6 weeks of the course centre around a design project delivered by each discipline. This course is integrated with APSC 293 , and coordinated by the same instructor.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 100  
    COREQUISITE(S): APSC 293  
    EXCLUSION(S): MECH 212  , APSC 202  

  
  •  

    APSC 202 Engineering Design and Practice II: Client-Based Design W | 3 K4


    In this course students will participate constructively on teams to create solutions to client-based open-ended design problems using standard design methods and tools. This project-based course provides instruction on problem scoping, creativity and idea generation, decision making incorporating technical, economic, societal, and environmental factors, safety, engineering codes and regulations, and engineering ethics. Students work in teams to define problems, gather and identify appropriate information, work effectively with teammates, generate ideas, select ideas, and implement a solution to a presented problem from a client. This course is integrated with APSC 293 , and taught by the same instructor. NOTE: This course is only open to students transferring into year 2 or above of a Queen’s Engineering program.

    Academic Units:
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 101  and permission of the Associate Dean (Academic)
    COREQUISITE(S): APSC 293 
    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 100 , APSC 103 ,APSC 200 , and MECH 212 

  
  •  

    APSC 221 Economics and Business Practices in Engineering F/W/S | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course will provide the student in the Engineering program with the ability to appropriately incorporate selected economic and business practices into the practice of engineering. The practices covered include: business planning for the enterprise, enterprise economic analysis, project management process, project economic analysis, risk analysis and management, quality management and change management. Assignments and examples are based on situations from engineering based industries. Also Available Online.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 36
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 321 , COMM 244

  
  •  

    APSC 223 Global Project Management S | K3


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: Yes
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course will cover the knowledge areas and processes of the globally-recognized PM Body of Knowledge: integration, scope, cost, time, risk, human resources, stakeholders and procurement management. The focus will be a practical, applied approach, utilizing the global city of London, its engineering firms, experts, practitioners and massive engineering undertakings (The Shard, Cross-Rail, the Eurotunnel, the Thames Barrier, etc.) to investigate the problems, challenges and successes of managing global engineering projects. Note that the first week of instruction for this course will be held at Queen’s, prior to the start of the 6-week BISC-based workshop.

    Academic Units:
    Complementary Studies 36
    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 221  or CHEE 310  or permission of the instructor. Students should have taken engineering economics prior to taking the Global Project Management courses, however it is not critical, if you have not yet completed APSC 221  or CHEE 310 , please e-mail Lynann Clapham to discuss the possibility of a prerequisite waiver.
  
  •  

    APSC 262 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR: Engineering Surveying | 3.25


    Lecture: 1.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1.75
    This introductory course in plane surveying consists of about 16 hours of lectures, the rest of the time being spent in the field. Lecture material includes distance measurement, differential, profile and indirect leveling and use of transit, traversing and mapping. Errors, corrections and balancing are also discussed. The use of available software packages for the reduction and calculation of data is encouraged throughout the course. In the field, students practice the basic techniques of instrument use through various assignments. Careful and efficient handling of instruments and proper note-keeping are stressed. The use of state-of-the-art electronic surveying instruments is included in the field assignments wherever possible. The school is held on campus immediately following the final First Year examination in April.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 40
    Engineering Design 0

    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 211

  
  •  

    APSC 291 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR: Engineering Communications I F | 1


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides an introduction to effective engineering writing and speaking skills with the emphasis on technical proposals, professional correspondence, engineering reports, and oral briefings. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of Instructor
    EXCLUSION(S): CHEE 260, ELEC 291, GEOE 291 (GEOL 291), GEOE 292 (GEOL 292), MECH 290

  
  •  

    APSC 292 Deleted - Engineering Communications II W | 1.25


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.75
    This course continues to develop skills in engineering writing and speaking from APSC 291 , focusing on product specifications and evaluations, engineering reports, and formal oral presentations. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 291  
    EXCLUSION(S): CHEE 260, ELEC 291, ELEC 391, MECH 290, GEOE 291 (GEOL 291), GEOE 292 (GEOL 292)

  
  •  

    APSC 293 Engineering Communications l F/W | K1


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course provides an introduction to effective engineering writing and speaking skills with the emphasis on professional correspondence, engineering reports, oral briefings, and formal oral presentations. These skills are developed in lectures and small group tutorials. This course is integrated with APSC 200 , and coordinated by the same instructor.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 100 
    COREQUISITE(S): APSC 200  or permission of instructor
    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 292 , CHEE 260, ELEC 291, ELEC 391, GEOL 291, GEOL 292, MECH 290

  
  •  

    APSC 301 Professional Internship |


    The professional internship involves spending a minimum of twelve months and a maximum of sixteen months in a paid internship position in industry or government. Students in the 12-month internship must register in APSC 302 , APSC 303  and either APSC 301 or APSC 304 . Students in the 16 month placement take APSC 301, APSC 302 , APSC 303  and APSC 304 . The nature of the work must satisfy the criteria defining professional experience for licensure as a Professional Engineer in Canada. The course includes prior workshops on interviewing, resume preparation and work performance. Successful completion of the course requires submission of a report of high quality on the experience within thirty days of completion of the work period. Career Services manage the non-academic aspects of the course.

    Academic Units:
    PREREQUISITE(S): Faculty English Proficiency Test, or 80% in ESLA 130 taken prior to the 2004 - 2005 academic session.
  
  •  

    APSC 302 Professional Internship |


    See APSC 301 .

    Academic Units:
  
  •  

    APSC 303 Professional Internship |


    See APSC 301 .

    Academic Units:
  
  •  

    APSC 304 Professional Internship |


    See APSC 301 .

    Academic Units:
  
  •  

    APSC 321 Deleted - Economic and Business Practices in Mining and Geological Engineering |


    This course will provide the student in the Mining Engineering or Geological Engineering program with the ability to appropriately incorporate selected economic and business practices into the practice of engineering. The practices covered include: business planning for the enterprise, enterprise economic analysis, project management process, project economic analysis, risk analysis and management, quality management and change management. Assignments, examples, and tutorials are based on current situations from the Mining and Geological Engineering based industries. - COURSE DELETED 2013-2014

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    EXCLUSION(S): APSC 221 , COMM 244, GEOL 472

  
  •  

    APSC 381 Advanced Design and Skills for Innovation W | K3.5


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    This multidisciplinary project-based course will provide students with a broad range of knowledge and skills for design and innovation. Topics span the breadth of the innovation process, including advanced topics such as risk analysis, FMEA, reliability, and elements of six sigma methodologies. Elements of project management, market and economic analysis, and other professional practice topics are interwoven. Students work in multidisciplinary teams on relevant and realistic projects, simulating the real-world engineering environment. This course provides direct entry to the elective final year capstone project course “APSC 480 Multi-disciplinary Industry Engineering Design Project FW | K9    ”, and provides an excellent foundation for innovation in both intrapreneurial and entrepreneurial opportunities

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): Successful completion of all second year core courses.  Only students registered in year 3 can add APSC 381 on SOLUS.  If the course is full, you may contact the instructor to be added to a waiting list. Students registered as year 4 or above may contact the instructor for permission to enrol in the course.
  
  •  

    APSC 400 Deleted - Technology, Engineering and Management (TEAM) FW* | 6.5


    Lecture: 3.5
    Lab: 3
    Tutorial: 0
    Where appropriate, multidiscipline teams of engineering, commerce, law, and science students act as consultants to industrial and governmental clients. Projects include a phase of self-directed problem definition and project scope definition in the fall term, followed by project execution in the winter term. Typical projects involve evaluation of technical alternatives (with an emphasis on health, safety, and environmental), preparation of detailed recommendations, and both market and financial analysis. Project topics vary widely and are provided by a diverse list of fee paying clients. The course includes seminars on project management. There are several meetings during the Fall term to organize groups and select projects, but regularly scheduled lectures do not begin until the Winter term. Teams interact regularly with clients at both a technical and a management level, and are also assigned an industrial project mentor. Students manage their own budget, travel arrangements etc. The course concludes with a comprehensive report and presentation at the client’s office. The course is managed by the Department of Chemical Engineering. Further information, including a list of projects, can be found at: http://team.appsci.queensu.ca/ **Replaced with CHEE 400 Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 21
    Engineering Science 29
    Engineering Design 28

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    APSC 480 Multi-disciplinary Industry Engineering Design Project FW | K9


    Lecture: Yes
    Lab: No
    Tutorial: Yes
    This course will enhance student’s design, innovation, critical thinking, and professional skills by experiencing real-time industry-funded projects. Working in multidisciplinary teams, students are guided by experienced engineering professionals both internally and externally. Teams interface frequently with the client, including occasional external site visits. Projects cover a broad range of engineering disciplines, and often incorporate the development of physical prototype(s) or digital models/simulations for evaluation and testing, as well as techno-economic elements. Students will integrate elements of engineering design, innovation, and professional practice from prior courses, with enhancements from occasional lectures, workshops, and guest speakers. Project funding supports all necessary travel, communication, software, equipment, prototyping components and related services. Professional engineering skills such as communication, teamwork, project management, engineering economics, ethics, and safety will be integral to the projects. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 28
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 80

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 381  . For final year students without the APSC 381  pre-requisite, enrolment may be requested by contacting the Instructor.

Biochemistry

  
  •  

    BCHM 310 General Biochemistry FW | 9


    Lecture: 6
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Principles of protein biochemistry, enzymology, and protein engineering. Metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids and lipids. Role of coenzymes. Generation and storage of metabolic energy. Principles of regulatory mechanisms, membrane structure and function, hormone action, and cellular signalling.NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 90
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): ENCH 281  (CHEM 281) and CHEM 282, or ENCH 211  (CHEM 211) and ENCH 212  (CHEM 212) and ENCH 245  (CHE
    EXCLUSION(S): BCHM 315 , BCHM 316

  
  •  

    BCHM 315 Proteins and Enzymes F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    Principles of protein biochemistry, enzymology, and protein engineering.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 36
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): ENCH 281  (CHEM 281) and CHEM 282, or ENCH 211  (CHEM 211) and ENCH 212  (CHEM 212) and ENCH 245  (CHEM 245), or permission of the department.
    EXCLUSION(S): BCHM 310 

  
  •  

    BCHM 410 Protein Structure and Function F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0
    This course presents an integrated approach to the study of protein function. Topics include proteomic techniques, mass spectrometry, protein purification, imaging, surface plasmon resonance, calorimetry, bioinformatics and protein evolution, protein modifications and processing, interpretation and applications of 3-D structure, and structure-function relationships. NOTE: Offered jointly with BCHM 810*.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 36
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the Department.

Biology

  
  •  

    BIOL 102 Introductory Biology of Cells F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.8
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to the basic themes and concepts of modern biology spanning organizational levels from molecules to cells in an evolutionary context. RECOMMENDATION 4U Biology and Chemistry, or equivalent high school background are highly recommended.NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 45
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    BIOL 103 Introductory to Biology of Organisms W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.8
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to the basic themes and concepts of modern biology spanning organizational levels from organisms to ecosystems in an evolutionary context. NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 45
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): BIOL 102  
  
  •  

    BIOL 205 Mendelian and Molecular Genetics F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    An introduction to Mendelian and molecular genetics covering the basic mechanisms of genetic transmission, gene structure and function, as well as the application of molecular genetics in medicine and biotechnology. NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 54
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): BIOL 102 , BIOL 103  
  
  •  

    BIOL 335 Limnology and Aquatic Ecology F | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1.5
    Tutorial: 0
    Physics, chemistry and biology of freshwater lakes. Emphasis on: morphometry; light and temperature; water chemistry in relation to nutrients; physiological requirements; composition and interaction of algal and invertebrate populations; eutrophication; pollution; environmental change. NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science NOTE: BIOL 200 (or BIOL 201 and BIOL 202) highly recommended.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 54
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEM 112, or APSC 131  and APSC 132 .
  
  •  

    BIOM 300 Modeling Techniques in Biology W | 3


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Modeling will be presented in the context of biological examples drawn from ecology and evolution, including life history evolution, sexual selection, evolutionary epidemiology and medicine, and ecological interactions. Techniques will be drawn from dynamical systems, probability, optimization, and game theory with emphasis put on how to formulate and analyze models. NOTE: Course weighting is defined by the Faculty of Arts and Science

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 31
    Natural Sciences 11
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 172 ; APSC 174  recommended

Chemical Engineering

  
  •  

    CHEE 209 Analysis of Process Data F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Statistical methods for analyzing and interpreting process data are discussed, with special emphasis on techniques for continuous improvement of process operations. Topics include: role of data in assessing process operation, identifying major problems, graphical and numerical summaries, principles of valid inference, probability distributions for discrete and continuous data, process capability, comparing process performance to target values, comparing performances of two processes, control charts, and an introduction to linear regression analysis.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 27
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 15
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171  , APSC 172  , APSC 174  
    EXCLUSION(S): STAT 268, STAT 269, MTHE 367  (STAT 367)

  
  •  

    CHEE 210 Thermodynamic Properties of Fluids W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course is an introduction to the thermodynamics of fluids for chemical engineering applications. Concepts to be learned include heat, work, internal energy, enthalpy, entropy, and state functions. Students will understand how to calculate heat and work effects arising from physical processes such as expansion and contraction of fluids and how to calculate the thermodynamic properties of fluids using equations of state, residual properties and correlations. Course concepts will be reinforced in a project.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 221  (or MINE 201 )
    COREQUISITE(S): None
  
  •  

    CHEE 218 Laboratory Projects I W | 2.5


    Lecture: 0.15
    Lab: 2
    Tutorial: 0.35
    The projects provide a practical introduction to processes that occur in chemical engineering operations. Bench-scale and pilot plant equipment are used. Students plan and carry out the experiments, analyze the data and prepare written reports

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 10
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 100  (or APSC 102  ), CHEE 209 , or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 221 Chemical Processes and Systems F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Introduction to the fundamentals and principles of chemical engineering, with applications to chemical and biochemical processes, via an analysis of processing units including distillation, crystallization and combustion. Specific topics include conservation equations for mass and energy, process flow diagrams, material and energy balances, chemical reaction fundamentals, and applications of the First Law of Thermodynamics.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 131 , APSC 132 , APSC 172 , or permission of the department
  
  •  

    CHEE 222 Process Dynamics and Numerical Methods W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Time-varying operation of chemical and biochemical processes is introduced. Dynamic mathematical models are formulated using material and energy balances. Effects of operational and design parameters on steady-state and dynamic operations are investigated. Numerical techniques are introduced to solve systems of algebraic and differential equations. Numerical and symbolic computation tools are used to analyze dynamic and steady-state process behaviour.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 22
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 142 , CHEE 221 , MTHE 225  (MATH 225) or permission of the department
  
  •  

    CHEE 223 Fluid Mechanics W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Principles of momentum and energy transport are applied to the analysis of fluid systems commonly encountered in chemical engineering practice. This approach is via the macroscopic and differential balances of mass, momentum and energy. Topics include fluid statics; incompressible flow in closed conduits; flow and pressure measurement; transportation of fluids; laminar, turbulent and creeping flows; boundary layer effects; sizing of commercial components (piping, tubing, valves, pressure and flow meters and other fittings, as well as pumps) for fluid transport systems in industrial settings.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 221 , MTHE 225 
    COREQUISITE(S): None
  
  •  

    CHEE 224 Transport Phenomena Fundamentals F | 3


    Lecture: 2
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1
    The theory and mathematical framework of transport phenomena are introduced. Mass, energy and momentum balances are developed using the integral and differential methods of analysis. The tools used to formulate and solve the problems include representation of physical entities in vector form, multivariable functions and vector operations in 2D and 3D. Specific topics of Chemical Engineering interest include moments of a force, work done by a force, moments of inertia, control surfaces and control volumes and fluid kinematics.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 18
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 171 , APSC 172 
  
  •  

    CHEE 229 Cell Based Engineering Principles F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.75
    Tutorial: 0.25
    Introduction to the Biological, Biochemical and Life Science principles of cell/ enzyme based engineering systems and processes. The emphasis will be placed on microbial cell culture, but comparisons will be drawn to related systems including viral, plant and animal cell culture as it relates to medicine, industrial practice or the environment.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 35
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 13
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 131  and APSC 132 ; or equivalents or permission of the Department.
    EXCLUSION(S): MICR 221

  
  •  

    CHEE 310 Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This is a course about innovation – distinctive ideas, of value, put to practice – and entrepreneurship – the process of putting to practice and sustaining the implementation of innovations – for societal benefit and wealth creation. Curiosity of the world around us is emphasized for identifying opportunities to have an impact and make a difference, to which a discipline is imposed - one that identifies who might be interested in or benefit from our product or service, and how we can bring an idea to fruition and provide the necessary resources (e.g., financial, intellectual) to provide it to society. Legal aspects (e.g., incorporation, partnerships), raising capital, and protecting the strategic advantage of intellectual property (e.g., patents, trade secrets) are discussed, together with the importance of having a social license to operate. The concept of a business model, summarized using the business model canvas methodology, is presented, together with the concept of a business plan describing how a venture will be operated over a time horizon. For-profit and not-for-profit ventures, and the elements of the business models for each, are studied and compared. Financial metrics for assessing the viability of ventures and guiding investment decisions are presented (e.g., IRR, NPV, EBITDA). Systems Thinking (recognizing the whole/parts and that which is common/distinct) is introduced. Design Thinking – a human-centered design emphasizing observation and experimentation gaining traction in engineering, business and social sciences – is presented. Working in groups, students identify a venture opportunity having a technological component, and propose a business model and plan as the major evaluation in the course. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 311 Fluid Phase and Reaction Equilibrium F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course is concerned with the application of thermodynamics to practical problems of the chemical industry. Emphasis is placed on the study of phase equilibrium, including vapour-liquid equilibrium and liquid-liquid equilibrium. Contemporary methods of calculating the thermodynamic properties of non-ideal vapours and liquids will be presented and applied. The principles of chemical reaction equilibrium will also be studied. The design component of the course will require students to perform theoretical vapour-liquid equilibrium calculations and recommend proper operating conditions for a single-stage unit (flash drum) that separates a non-ideal binary mixture.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 210 
  
  •  

    CHEE 315 Laboratory Projects II F/W | 4


    Lecture: 0.25
    Lab: 3
    Tutorial: 0.75
    The main objectives are to develop skill in using process and analytical equipment, to examine the strengths, weaknesses, and limitations of current theory, to improve the student’s ability to obtain and interpret data, to demonstrate the value of planning experiments, to develop engineering judgement, and to provide experience in oral and written reporting.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 16
    Engineering Science 32
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 222  and CHEE 223  
  
  •  

    CHEE 319 Process Dynamics and Control W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The dynamic behaviour and automatic control of processes are studied. Mathematical tools for analyzing the transient behaviour of open and closed-loop systems are presented. The steps of controller development are treated: process characterization (using mathematical models), controller design, and implementation. Methods for assessing system stability and performance are investigated, and are used in the design of controllers. Frequency response methods are introduced, as is the development and implementation of controller enhancements including feedforward and cascade control.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 222  or MINE 201 , MTHE 225  (MATH 225), CHEE 321  or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 321 Chemical Reaction Engineering F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course provides a detailed and in depth analysis to the principles of chemical kinetics, and reactor analysis and design. The topics in chemical kinetics include: rate constants, reaction order, rate equations for elementary and complex reactions, kinetic data analysis, and product distribution. In reactor analysis and design, discussion is focused on ideal reactor systems and arrangements, including batch reactors, plug flow reactors, continuous stirred tank reactors, and recycle reactors. The last part of the course considers homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The design component consists of how to make an appropriate choice of reactor type and operating conditions to optimize a desired product; sizing such reactors and determining conversion levels under various conditions of temperature and pressure; determination of reaction kinetics from experimental data. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 210 , (CHEE 222  or MINE 201 ), or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 323 Industrial Catalysis W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Students will learn, discuss and apply knowledge of the chemical structure and reactivity of industrial catalytic compounds, with particular emphasis placed upon the integration of fundamental catalytic chemistry with the principles of chemical reaction engineering, transport phenomena and thermodynamics. Industrial processes of interest include homogeneous ionic, radical, and coordinative catalytic systems, as well as heterogeneous fluid-solid systems. The design component of the course will require students to develop catalytic processes to meet productivity targets from provided kinetic and thermodynamic data. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 10
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 16

    PREREQUISITE(S): ENCH 245 , CHEE 321 , CHEE 330  or permission of the Chemical Engineering department 
  
  •  

    CHEE 324 Organic Process Development W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Students will expand their knowledge of functional group interconversions and C-C bond forming reactions learned in ENCH 245 , and apply retrosynthetic analysis to propose multi-step syntheses of organic target molecules. Selection of reagents, solvents and reaction conditions will be examined in the context of process safety, reaction yield, product isolation, and profitability. This will be followed by studies of target molecule recovery by extraction, recrystallization, distillation and chromatography. The design component of the course is a series of two-hour design challenges in which student teams generate solutions to process development problems. This includes proposing reaction sequences for producing a target molecule, conducting safety analyses of hazardous reactions, choosing from multiple synthetic routes, and recommending separation trains for product isolation.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 15
    Engineering Design 15

    PREREQUISITE(S): ENCH 245  and CHEE 311  
    EXCLUSION(S): ENCH 345  

  
  •  

    CHEE 330 Heat and Mass Transfer F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course follows a unified approach to introduce the physical origins and rate equations of heat and mass transfer. The principal topics covered include identification of the driving forces for heat and mass diffusion, development of transport models from first principles, steady state and transient solutions, and convective transfer. The boundary layer analogies are introduced. Closed form analytical solutions and correlations derived from dimensional analysis are used to estimate the heat and mass transfer convection coefficients.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 210 , CHEE 223 , or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 331 Design of Unit Operations W | K 4.5


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: no
    Tutorial: yes
    This course is part of the Engineering Design and Practice Sequence offered at the 3rd year level to students following the Chemical Engineering CHE1 Option. Heat and mass transfer knowledge is applied in the analysis and design of unit operations, including separation processes and heat exchanging equipment. The equilibrium stage concept is used to perform calculations and size separation processes including distillation, gas absorption/stripping and liquid-liquid extraction. Heat transfer processes are taught with an emphasis on the design various types of heat exchanging equipment, including shell and tube heat exchangers, condensers and reboilers. The chemical process design component of the course involves a series of activities, dealing with the design of separation processes, heat exchanger sizing and design, process hazards analysis, implementation of instrumentation and construction of piping and instrument diagrams. In addition to choosing and sizing unit operations and implementing appropriate process instrumentation, the students will learn to use simulation tools and will incorporate economics, safety and environmental responsibility in all stages of the design. The course is integrated with CHEE 361   “Engineering Communications, Ethics and Professionalism.” 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200  or APSC 202 APSC 293 , CHEE 311 , CHEE 321 , CHEE 330 , or permission of the department.
    COREQUISITE(S): CHEE 361  
  
  •  

    CHEE 332 Design of Unit Operations W | K 4.5


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: no
    Tutorial: yes
    This course is part of the Engineering Design and Practice Sequence offered at the 3rd year level to students following the Chemical Engineering CHE2 Option. Heat and mass transfer knowledge is applied in the analysis and design of unit operations, including separation processes and heat exchanging equipment. The equilibrium stage concept is used to perform calculations and size separation processes including distillation, gas absorption/stripping and liquid-liquid extraction. Heat transfer processes are taught with an emphasis on the design various types of heat exchanging equipment, including shell and tube heat exchangers, condensers and reboilers. The chemical process design component of the course involves a series of activities, dealing with the design of separation processes, with an emphasis on bioseparations, heat exchanger sizing and design, process hazards analysis, implementation of instrumentation and construction of piping and instrument diagrams. In addition to choosing and sizing unit operations and implementing appropriate process instrumentation, the students will learn to use simulation tools and will incorporate economics, safety and environmental responsibility in all stages of the design. The course is integrated with CHEE 361   “Engineering Communications, Ethics and Professionalism.”

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200 or APSC 202 ,  APSC 293 , CHEE 311 , CHEE 321 , CHEE 330 , or permission of the department.
    COREQUISITE(S): CHEE 361  
  
  •  

    CHEE 333 Design of Unit Operations W | K 4.5


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: no
    Tutorial: yes
    This course is part of the Engineering Design and Practice Sequence offered at the 3rd year level to Engineering Chemistry students. Heat and mass transfer knowledge is applied in the analysis and design of unit operations, including separation processes and heat exchanging equipment. The equilibrium stage concept is used to perform calculations and size separation processes including distillation, gas absorption/stripping and liquid-liquid extraction. Heat transfer processes are taught with an emphasis on the design various types of heat exchanging equipment, including shell and tube heat exchangers, condensers and reboilers. The chemical process design component of the course involves a series of activities, dealing with the design of separation processes for industrial chemicals, heat exchanger sizing and design, process hazards analysis, implementation of instrumentation and construction of piping and instrument diagrams. In addition to choosing and sizing unit operations and implementing appropriate process instrumentation, the students will learn to use simulation tools and will incorporate economics, safety and environmental responsibility in all stages of the design. The course is integrated with CHEE 361   “Engineering Communications, Ethics and Professionalism.” 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200  or APSC 202 APSC 293 , CHEE 311 , CHEE 321 , CHEE 330 , or permission of the department.
    COREQUISITE(S): CHEE 361  
  
  •  

    CHEE 340 Biomedical Engineering W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course will provide students with a fundamental understanding of cell biology, human physiology and the application of engineering principles (momentum and mass transfer, mechanics, materials) for the solution of medical problems. Topics include: Cell Biology, Anatomy and Physiology, Transport Phenomena in the Body, Biomechanics, Materials in Medicine, and Regenerative Medicine and Tissue Engineering. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    EXCLUSION(S): CHEE 442

  
  •  

    CHEE 342 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Environmental Biotechnology F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course gives a broad perspective of the use of microbial systems to treat environmental pollutants and of microorganisms as potential environmental contaminants. Biogeochemical cycles and their applications to processes such as the desulphurization of coal and crude oil, biocorrosion, mineral (eg. uranium, copper and iron) leaching, the degradation of organic compounds, and nitrate removal from drinking water will be studied. Microbial waste disposal systems such as composting and soil bioremediation and the role of biotechnology in waste minimization will be examined. Microorganisms found in air, soil and water, their detection, enumeration and control will be discussed. **Not offered in 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 360 Deleted - Technical Communications W | 1.5


    Lecture: 0.75
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.75
    This course provides advanced instruction and practice in effective technical writing and oral presentation. Most exercises will be linked to required oral and written communications tasks in other courses. Open to Chemical Engineering and Engineering chemistry students only. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 18
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    COREQUISITE(S): CHEE 331  or CHEE 332  or CHEE 333 , or permission of the Department
  
  •  

    CHEE 361 Engineering Communications, Ethics & Professionalism W | K1


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: yes
    Tutorial: yes
    This course provides advanced instruction and practice in engineering communications, engineering ethics and professionalism. Effective engineering writing and speaking skills are developed with an emphasis on engineering reports and oral presentations. Students will learn how to gather literature sources, apply appropriate citation styles, write effective resumes, and present data effectively. Activities include case studies involving the application of codes, engineering ethics, equity and professionalism. This course is integrated with CHEE 331 /CHEE 332 /CHEE 333  

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 200  or APSC 202 , APSC 293  or permission of the Department.
    COREQUISITE(S): CHEE 331  or CHEE 332  or CHEE 333 , or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 370 Deleted - Waste Treatment Processes W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The sources and characteristics of liquid waste streams emanating from chemical and related industries are reviewed as the basis for developing appropriate abatement and treatment strategies. Treatment processes utilizing individual operations as well as integrated systems of physical, chemical and biological treatment are covered. Waste treatment process designs and sensitivity analyses of alternatives are undertaken with the help of Computer Aided Design software. Canadian guidelines, regulations and industrial case studies are presented. Deleted 2016-2017

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 17
    Engineering Design 25

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 221  or MINE 201 , or permission of the department
    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 372 , CIVL 470  

  
  •  

    CHEE 371 Mitigation of Industrial Pollution W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Sources and characteristics of waste streams emanating from chemical and related industries are reviewed as the basis for developing appropriate abatement and treatment strategies. Treatment processes utilizing individual operations as well as integrated systems of physical, chemical and biological treatment are covered. Treatment process designs and sensitivity analyses of alternatives are undertaken for case studies involving industrial solid, liquid and gaseous wastes. Canadian guidelines and regulations are presented and implemented within the context of environmental and human health.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 221  or MINE 201  , or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 380 Biochemical Engineering F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Biochemical Engineering involves the application of Chemical Engineering principles and approaches to biologically-based systems and processes. Biochemical Engineering is central to the area of environmental engineering, and to biotechnology processes which produce pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals and genetically engineered products. The course involves a systematic and quantitative description of medium formulation and sterilization, microbial kinetics and bioreactor design, product isolation and purification, and examples of current industrial practices and processes.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 221   or permission of the Chemical Engineering department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 400 Technology, Engineering & Management (TEAM) FW | K7


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: no
    Tutorial: no
    Multidiscipline teams of engineering, commerce, law, and/or science students, as appropriate, act as consultants to industrial and governmental clients. Projects include a phase of self-directed problem definition and project scope definition in the fall term, followed by project execution in the winter term. Typical projects involve evaluation of technical alternatives (with an emphasis on health, safety, and environmental), preparation of detailed recommendations, and both market and financial analysis. Project topics vary widely and are provided by a diverse list of fee paying clients. The course includes seminars on project management. There are several meetings during the fall term to organize groups and select projects, but regularly scheduled lectures do not begin until the Winter term. Teams interact regularly with clients at both a technical and a management level, and are also assigned an industrial project mentor. Students master project management skills, by managing their own budget, travel arrangements etc. The course concludes with a comprehensive report and presentation to the client. The course is managed by the Department of Chemical Engineering

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 42
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 42

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the instructor
  
  •  

    CHEE 405 Biochemical/Biomedical Research Project FW | 7


    Lecture: 0.25
    Lab: 6
    Tutorial: 0.75
    Students will conduct research on a Biochemical/Biomedical Engineering related project. Based on the project objective provided by their faculty supervisor, the students will work independently to develop an experimental and/or modeling methodology, conduct experiments or simulations and generate data. Students will submit interim oral and written progress reports and a final oral presentation and technical report. They will be expected to present and defend their results in a conference/seminar setting. Students enrolling for this course are advised to consult with the faculty member supervisor concerned late in the winter term of their 3rd year of study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 84
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 406 Bioenvironmental Research Project FW | 7


    Lecture: 0.25
    Lab: 6
    Tutorial: 0.75
    Students will conduct research on a Bioenvironmental Engineering related project. Based on the project objective provided by their faculty supervisor, the students will work independently to develop an experimental and/or modeling methodology, conduct experiments or simulations and generate data. Students will submit interim oral and written progress reports and a final oral presentation and technical report. They will be expected to present and defend their results in a conference/seminar setting. Students enrolling for this course are advised to consult with the faculty member supervisor concerned late in the winter term of their 3rd year of study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 84
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 407 Deleted - Biochemical/Biomedical/Bioenvironmental Research Seminar W | 3


    Lecture: 1
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 2
    Students will attend and report on a series of seminars presented by researchers in the field of Biochemical Engineering. Each student will deliver interactive seminar presentations, based on assigned topics in the field. After conducting a literature review, students will submit a review term paper, or a case study based on their reading and understanding of the literature. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 14
    Engineering Science 22
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 408 Bioengineering Research Project FW | K7


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: yes
    Tutorial: yes
    Students will conduct research on a Biochemical/Biomedical/Bioenvironmental Engineering related project. Based on the project objective provided by their faculty supervisor, the students will work independently to develop an experimental and/or modeling methodology, conduct experiments or simulations and generate data. Students will submit interim oral and written progress reports and a final oral presentation and technical report. They will be expected to present and defend their results in a conference/seminar setting. Students enrolling for this course are advised to consult with the faculty member supervisor concerned late in the winter term of their 3rd year of study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 28
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 56

  
  •  

    CHEE 412 Transport Phenomena W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The transport phenomena approach is followed to study and analyze transport of momentum, energy and mass, with special focus on combined transport problems. Solutions are developed for problems involving steady-state and unsteady flows, isothermal and non-isothermal conditions, as well as non-Newtonian liquids. This course completes the students’ intellectual training in the transport sciences culminating in their mastery of combined transport problems, including fluid flow with heat transfer, or mass transport with fluid flow, or heat transfer with mass transport.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 223 , CHEE 224 ,  CHEE 330 , or permission of the department
    EXCLUSION(S): CHEE 452  

  
  •  

    CHEE 418 Strategies for Process Investigations F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The roles of designed experiments and data analysis procedures in process investigations are discussed. Applications of two-level factorial and fractional factorial designs in screening studies and higher-order designs for response surface characterization and exploration are examined. Least squares procedures for fitting and testing mathematical models, and for assessing model predictions, are described. Empirical in-plant optimization procedures are also considered. Established and evolving approaches for quality and productivity improvement are examined. The design component of this course is the planning and execution of an experimental investigation, the analysis of the resulting data, and the formulation of recommendations on the basis of those results.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 12
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 18
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 209 , or permission of the department
    EXCLUSION(S): STAT 361

  
  •  

    CHEE 420 Laboratory Projects III F/W | K 4


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: yes
    Tutorial: yes
    Students will work as teams to tackle projects that require bench and pilot plant equipment, and computer packages that simulate commercial processes. The projects will be more extensive and integrated than in previous laboratories, and will require a thorough and comprehensive analysis of processes and operations. A strong emphasis is placed on project planning and management, as well as professional communication with supervisors. The design component of this course is found in the application of process analysis skills to solve problems. The projects require the students to apply critical and problem solving skills in the operation or simulation of laboratory and process equipment with the goal of solving a problem for a fictitious industrial client. The projects may involve analysis or troubleshooting of existing equipment, or an investigation of the applicability of a concept to a new area.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 16
    Engineering Science 16
    Engineering Design 16

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 311 , CHEE 321 , CHEE 330 , CHEE 315 , CHEE 319 , or permission of the department
  
  •  

    CHEE 421 Research Project FW | K 7


    This course provides an opportunity for students to work on an individual basis with faculty members of the department. Students will submit interim oral and written progress reports and a final oral presentation and technical report. They will be expected to present and defend their results in a conference/seminar setting. The projects may be concerned with engineering design and development work or may be of a more fundamental research nature. Students enrolling for this course are advised to consult with the faculty member concerned late in the winter term of their 3rd year of study.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 28
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 56

    PREREQUISITE(S): ECGPA of 3.20 or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 434 Process Control II W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course presents methods for dynamic analysis and controller design for multivariable process control problems, and discrete time control. Control techniques, including feedforward and cascade control, are discussed further, and the concept of model predictive control is presented. Multivariable controller design and the problem of control loop interaction are examined. State space models for processes are introduced. Mathematical tools for analyzing the dynamics of sampled data systems are developed, and the design of discrete time controllers is introduced. Techniques discussed in the course are applied to the control of various chemical process units. This course is offered jointly with CHEE 821.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 29
    Engineering Design 13

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 319 , or permission of the department
  
  •  

    CHEE 436 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - System Identification F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The course focuses on the theory and application of linear time series methods for system identification. Time domain and frequency domain methods for analyzing dynamic data will be presented. Standard process plus disturbance models encountered in the identification literature will be investigated from both statistical and physical perspectives. Methods for structural identification, incorporation of exogenous variables, parameter estimation, inference and model adequacy will be examined in detail. The design of dynamic experiments and incorporation of model uncertainty into the intended model and use, such as prediction or control, will be discussed. Assignments will include the analysis of industrial data sets. Dynamic modelling using neural networks and nonlinear time series methods will be introduced.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 12
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 209 , CHEE 418 , or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 440 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Pharmaceutical Technology W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Pharmaceutics and the industrial manufacture of pharmaceutical dosage forms are introduced. Topics include the design and preparation of a successful dosage form with respect to the route of administration, and large scale manufacture in a sterile and clean environment. Aspects of chemical kinetics, physical chemistry, physiology, cell biology, mass and heat transfer, and fluid dynamics will be described as they relate to the manufacture of effective dosage forms. This course applies engineering concepts, such as mass transfer, unit operations, thermodynamics, and basic chemistry and is recommended for students in their 3rd or 4th year of studies.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 450 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Engineering Biology W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Topics include: biosynthesis of biologically based products: properties of biologically active materials including enzymes, polynucleotides and polypeptides; enzyme reaction kinetics; cell and tissue growth and production kinetics; cell and tissue culture engineering; diffusion and reaction involved immobilized cells and enzymes; bioprocess instrumentation. The course project will require the design of a biological reactor or downstream unit operation, or the specification of instrumentation for a particular bioprocess.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): ENCH 245  (CHEM 245)
  
  •  

    CHEE 452 Transport Phenomena in Physiological Systems F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This course is an introduction to the area of mass, momentum and heat transfer processes in physiological systems. In this course the student will appreciate the role of transport phenomena in the function of organs and organ systems in the body, and develop the skills necessary to analyze models of biological transport processes in the context of the design of biomedical devices.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 223  and CHEE 330 , or permission of the department
    EXCLUSION(S): CHEE 412  

  
  •  

    CHEE 460 Applied Surface and Colloid Science F | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The course covers four major topics. 1. The thermodynamic properties of interfaces (surface energy, wetting, surface area and porosity, capillary effects, work of adhesion/cohesion). 2. Models of adsorption/desorption phenomena. 3. The amphiphilic behaviour of surfactants. 4. The stability and characterization of colloidal systems. Student appreciation for the importance of these phenomena is cultivated using examples drawn from industrial processes/products including inks, paints, foods, polymer blends, and nanocomposites.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 210  or permission of the department.
    EXCLUSION(S): ENCH 347 (CHEM 347)

  
  •  

    CHEE 461 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Electrochemical Engineering W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    This engineering science course covers aspects of technological applications of electrochemistry. It can be considered as overlap between electrical engineering, electrochemistry and chemical engineering. The course addresses the following 6 major topics of electrochemical engineering: 1) Introduction to Electrochemical Engineering: Electrostatics, Electrodynamics, Electrical Circuit Theory, Faradays Law; 2) Elements of Electrochemical Systems I Electrolyte: Transport processes, electrolyte conductivity, pH and buffer solutions; 3) Elements of Electrochemical Systems II Electrodes: Electrochemical Thermodynamics, Nernst Equation, Reference Electrodes, Cell Potential (Electromotive Force), Electrode Kinetics 4) Electrical Double Layers: Theory & Models, Electrokinetic Phenomena; 5) Electrochemical Energy Engineering: Batteries, Fuel Cells, Electrical & Electrochemical Capacitors; 6) Industrial Electrochemical Processes: Fundamentals, Reactor Design & Parameter, Chlor-Alkali Process, Electrochemical Extraction of Metals, Hall Heroult Process.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 210 , CHEE 321 , or permission of the department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 470 Design of Manufacturing Processes F | K 7


    Lecture: yes
    Lab: no
    Tutorial: yes
    This course will consolidate the necessary skills and knowledge for a working chemical engineer by carrying out an industrial process design and developing a Front End Engineering Design (FEED) document. The students will develop proficiency in the following: Process selection and synthesis, the use and recognition of the limitations of process simulation software, development of Piping and Instrumentation diagrams, analysis of process safety, equipment sizing, materials selection, and economic analysis, including the estimation of capital and operating cost along with optimization. 

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 84

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 331   or CHEE 332   or CHEE 333  , CHEE 361  , or permission of the Department.
  
  •  

    CHEE 481 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Air Quality Management W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Fluid-particle systems and mass transfer principles are presented with application to air pollution control in industrial processes. The selection and design of equipment for the control of particulate and gaseous emission sources are examined. The problem of odorous emissions, stack sampling techniques and dispersion calculations are discussed.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 24
    Engineering Design 18

    PREREQUISITE(S): One of CHEE 223 , CIVL 250 , or MECH 241 , or permission of the department
  
  •  

    CHEE 484 Bioremediation W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Bioremediation as an option to treat contaminated soils and ground water. Advantages and disadvantages of bioremediation compared to nonbiological processes. Factors affecting choice of in situ or ex situ processes. Assessment of biodegradability; biostimulation vs bioaugmentation; mineralization vs. partial degradation; factors affecting microbial activity (choice of electron acceptor, toxicity of pollutant, C/N/P ratio, co-substrates, soil humidity, pH and temperature); bioavailability of pollutant. Biodegradation of specific contaminants (e.g. diesel fuel, polychlorinated biphenyls, dyestuffs, aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbons) will be studied in detail. The design component of this course consists of learning design of appropriate laboratory and field experiments to obtain data on microbial degradation of an organic pollutant to be able to calculate bioremediation design parameters such as mass and delivery rate requirements of electron acceptors and nutrients and degradation rates in reactor and non-reactor based systems; and to be aware of limitations of these calculations.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 42
    Engineering Design 0

  
  •  

    CHEE 490 NOT OFFERED THIS YEAR - Polymer Formulations and Processing Technology W | 3.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The design and manufacture of polymer products is reviewed, with particular emphasis on material selection and processing technology. The engineering properties of elastomers, thermoplastics, adhesives, fibres and coatings are discussed in terms of processing characteristics and end-use performance. Industrial processing operations such as extrusion, molding, mixing and film manufacture are presented in detail. The design component of the course requires students to select appropriate materials and processing methods for an engineering application. Examples include medical catheters, engine gaskets, drug capsules and biodegradable packaging.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 30
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CHEE 223  or MECH 241 , or permission of the department

Civil Engineering

  
  •  

    CIVL 200 Professional Skills I F | K 2.5


    Starting the very first day of the term, this week-long, intensive short-course serves as a kickoff to Civil Engineering at Queen’s. Students will be engaged in a design challenge where they are to conceive, design, implement and operate a system to achieve some specified function bounded by constraints. Focus will be placed on development of decision making, team building and engineering design skills.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 8
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 20

  
  •  

    CIVL 201 Professional Skills F/W | 2.5


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 1
    Within a team structure potentially involving second, third, and fourth year Civil Engineering students and a faculty advisor, students will engage in a range of exercises designed to promote written and verbal communication, decision making, team building and engineering design skills. Lectures, workshops, design charettes and both individual and team assignments will be utilized to enhance learning. This course is available only to select students, under exceptional or extenuating circumstances, at the discretion of the Head of the Department and the Undergraduate Chair. (This course may not be offered every year).

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 14
    Engineering Science 7
    Engineering Design 7

    PREREQUISITE(S): Permission of the Department
    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 200  

  
  •  

    CIVL 210 Chemistry for Civil Engineers F | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Application of fundamental chemistry principles with respect to their sources, reactions, effects and fates in civil and environmental engineering systems. Topics will include chemical equilibria, stoichiometry and reaction kinetics; electrochemistry and corrosion; adsorption and ion exchange; solubility and precipitation; coagulation; microbiological reactions and kinetics; biochemical, chemical and theoretical oxygen demand; acidity, alkalinity and hardness; as well as biogeochemical cycles. These concepts will be further developed and applied in tutorial and laboratory modules. A design-based laboratory is conducted as part of this course. Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) will be required for this course at student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 20
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 20
    Engineering Design 15

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 132  , APSC 131  
  
  •  

    CIVL 215 Materials for Civil Engineers W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The basic engineering properties, micro/macro structure, behaviour and applications of various civil engineering materials will be studied including materials used in structural engineering, hydrotechnincal engineering, geotechnical engineering and environmental engineering. This will include concrete, steel, timber, polymers, composites and soil. Interaction between materials will be examined. Laboratory experiments will be used to demonstrate material behaviour. PPE will be required for this course student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 12
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 32
    Engineering Design 10

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 151  
  
  •  

    CIVL 220 Statics and Solid Mechanics F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.25
    Tutorial: 0.75
    Review of statics, forces and equilibrium, internal forces in simple structures; axial, torsion, shear and moment diagrams; concepts of stress and strain; mechanical properties of materials; centroids and moments of areas; axial stress; flexural stress; shear stress in shafts and beams; calculation of displacement by integration; introduction to combined loading; introduction to column buckling. This course is designed primarily for mechanical engineering students.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 48
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111 , APSC 171 . Permission of the department for students not registered in Mechanical Engine
  
  •  

    CIVL 222 Numerical Methods for Civil Engineers W | 5


    Lecture: 4
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 0
    This course introduces the basics of numerical analysis and the use of computer software (MATLAB) for civil engineering analysis. Error analysis, numerical differentiation and integration, root finding, derivation and numerical solution of partial differential equations using finite difference methods, and optimization are among the topics covered. All problems emphasize engineering applications.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 45
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 15
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): MTHE 224  (MATH 224) or MTHE 225  (MATH 225) or MTHE 226 (MATH 226)
  
  •  

    CIVL 230 Solid Mechanics I F | 4.25


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.75
    Review of statics, forces, and equilibrium, internal forces in simple structures; axial, torsion, shear and moment diagrams; concepts of stress and strain; mechanical properties of materials; centroids and moments of areas; axial stress; flexural stress; shear stress in shafts and beams; calculation of displacement by integration; introduction to combined loading; introduction to column buckling. PPE will be required for this course at student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 50
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 111 , APSC 171 
    EXCLUSION(S): CIVL 220  and MECH 221 

  
  •  

    CIVL 231 Solid Mechanics II W | 4.5


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 1
    Calculation of bending displacements using moment-area methods; introduction to statically indeterminate systems; combined loading; stress and strain transformations; columns; energy methods; non-linear material behaviour; two-dimensional elasticity; advanced torsion problems.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 54
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 230 
  
  •  

    CIVL 250 Hydraulics I W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    Fluid properties, fluid statics, basic equations of fluid flow: Continuity, Momentum, Euler’s Equation of Motion, Linear Momentum Equation and Bernoulli’s Equation. Flow of real fluid in closed conduits: friction losses and local energy losses. Pipeline flows in engineering practice. PPE will be required for this course at student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 4
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 22
    Engineering Design 22

    PREREQUISITE(S): APSC 172 , APSC 174 
  
  •  

    CIVL 260 Deleted - Civil Engineering Design I F | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    The objectives of this introductory course are: to introduce students to engineering design and the challenges and excitement of the civil engineering profession; to develop written and oral communications skills; to develop an appreciation and ability for teamwork, creativity and time/project management; to develop skills in idea generation, creative problem solving, and research; and to develop skills in using computer applications in engineering design and analysis. The course exposes students to civil engineering design through case studies and group projects. Students are expected to learn about the design process through practice and, where possible, through implementation. Design projects are team-based and as such students need to learn how to work effectively with their peers. Sketching and AutoCAD are also be introduced and used. The design principles and concepts introduced will be used in follow-on courses throughout students’ degrees. - COURSE DELETED 2012-2013

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 12
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 24

  
  •  

    CIVL 300 Professional Skills II F | K 2.5


    Lecture: 0.5
    Lab: 1
    Tutorial: 1
    Professional skills relating to how engineers interact with, communicate with, and consider the implications of their actions on a wide range of potential stakeholders, ranging from colleagues to clients to society as a whole, will be developed. Students will improve their technical writing and verbal communication skills as they work through case studies intended to: deepen an understanding of the roles and responsibilities of a Professional Engineer; strengthen an ability to apply professional ethics, accountability and equity; and enhance an appreciation of the potential social and environmental impacts of engineering activities. Class discussions will normally occur every second week.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 28
    Engineering Science 0
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 200  
  
  •  

    CIVL 330 Structural Analysis F | 3.75


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.25
    Analysis of statically determinate structures such as trusses and plane frames, calculation of deflections by virtual work. Flexibility and stiffness methods for analyzing statically indeterminate structures. Computer applications of the above methods.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 44
    Engineering Design 0

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 230 , CIVL 231 
  
  •  

    CIVL 331 Structural Steel Design W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0
    Tutorial: 1
    Introduction to Limit States Design, load paths. Dead and live loads for design as specified in the National Building Code of Canada. Design assumptions regarding material properties of structural steel. Design of tension members; bolted connections; design of simple columns; design of beams (laterally supported and laterally unsupported) for flexure and shear; design of bearing stiffeners; design of steel-concrete composite beams; stability analysis; design of beam-columns. Sustainability for building materials; introduction to LEED.

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 330 
  
  •  

    CIVL 340 Geotechnical Engineering I F | 3.75


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.25
    An introductory course focussing on the fundamental mechanics of soil materials (gravel, sand, silt and clay) applied to geotechnical engineering problems. Topics studied include: phase relationships; index properties of coarse and fine grained soils; one-dimensional steady state seepage; effective stress; one-dimensional compression and consolidation; drained and undrained shear strength; and lateral earth pressure. Theoretical material is applied to examine real engineering issues with a particular focus on developing design skills and engineering judgement. Students will conduct physical experiments to explore soil behaviour. The important role of geology on the mechanics of geotechnical materials is emphasized through classroom discussions and problem sets. PPE will be required for this course at student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 32
    Engineering Design 12

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 215  or GEOE 281  (GEOL 281), CIVL 230  
  
  •  

    CIVL 341 Geotechnical Engineering II W | 4


    Lecture: 3
    Lab: 0.5
    Tutorial: 0.5
    A course focusing on design issues and methods of analysis for practical geotechnical engineering problems. Topics studied include: site investigation; capacity and settlement of shallow and deep foundations; two-dimensional steady state seepage; landslides and slope stability. Commercial software will be introduced to perform stability, deformation and seepage analyses. Students will conduct physical experiments to explore how design methods compare with real soil behaviour. The important role of geology in geotechnical design is emphasized through classroom discussions and problem sets. PPE will be required for this course at student’s cost (see course materials for details)

    Academic Units:
    Mathematics 0
    Natural Sciences 0
    Complementary Studies 0
    Engineering Science 12
    Engineering Design 36

    PREREQUISITE(S): CIVL 340  
 

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